University Archives

Building Profiles

These profiles contain information about the building, its construction, dedication, images, links to documents, and other interesting facts.

Atwood Memorial Center (1966)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Atwood Memorial Center groundbreaking
Atwood Memorial Center ground breaking, October 1964

Architect's rendering of both construction phases of Atwood Memorial Center

Architect's rendering of both phases of Atwood

Architect's rendering of both construction phases of Atwood Memorial Center

Atwood Memorial Center construction, 1965?

Atwood Memorial Center, November 1965

Atwood Memorial Center under construction, November 1965

Atwood Memorial Center, 1966

Atwood Memorial Center, 1966

Atwood ribbon cutting at dedication, November 1967

Atwood ribbon cutting at dedication, November 1967

Allen Atwood bust, 1966?

Allen Atwood bust, 1966?

Atwood Memorial Center, 1966

Atwood Memorial Center east entrance, 1967

Atwood Memorial Center, October 1976

Atwood Memorial Center construction, Phase II, June 1971

Atwood Memorial Center, October 1976

Atwood Memorial Center, October 1976

East addition of Atwood Memorial Center

East addition of Atwood Memorial Center, October 1995

The 1960s brought many curricular and physical changes to St. Cloud State. Classroom buildings and residence halls were added to accommodate the influx of students, yet there was no student union. Spaces in campus buildings had been used as “unofficial” student unions, including Erwin House and Mitchell Hall. Nearby businesses, especially the Chatterbox (formerly known as Almie’s), also served as gathering places for students. When opened in September 1966, Atwood Memorial Center was the first campus building to be constructed to serve solely as the student union.

While Atwood Memorial Center has gone through countless changes inside, the physical “footprint” of the building has expanded since it first opened. This profile will focus mostly on the “footprint.”

Discussion about a campus student union at St. Cloud State started at least by 1955. In November 1955, several staff members attended a conference sponsored by the Association of College Unions, which was held at the University of Minnesota. The report produced from that conference listed possible features of a student union, issues surrounding the development of a student union program, and philosophical thoughts about its development. The report stated that a student union was not simply a place for students to relax, but one that “strives[s] to provide real opportunities for personal and social development.” In response to this report, St. Cloud State president George Budd appointed a committee to study the feasibility of a student union at St. Cloud State. The committee concluded that a student union was a good idea to pursue.

By 1961, campus efforts were underway to create a “living room for campus.” Activities to inform and to provide student opinions were sponsored by the Student Center Committee, including content in the Chronicle student newspaper, a convocation event, a radio program, and a film showing. On April 6, 1961, 1,356 students (49% of full time students at St. Cloud State) took a survey about a campus student union. Of those surveyed, 80% were willing to be assessed a $5 fee per quarter to support a student union. In response to this survey, President Budd brought the request for the fee to the State College Board. The Board approved the request on August 11, 1961.

In April 1962, St. Cloud State announced a campaign to raise $500,000 from friends and alumni for the student union which was estimated to cost $1.5 million. The plan was for three different streams of funds each paying one-third of the cost – students, who were already paying $5 per quarter to support the student union; friends and alumni; and an appropriation from the state of Minnesota. A kick-off banquet was held on October 6, 1962. The campaign was very active, which included an appeal of why a student union was needed. This campaign was St. Cloud State’s first full scale effort to raise a substantial amount of funds in its history.

On August 17, 1962, the State College Board approved that the student union to be named “Atwood Memorial College Center.” The name honored the Atwood family and their contributions to St. Cloud State over many years, as well as donations well over $100,000 towards the student union. The board minutes singled out five members of the Atwood family – Clarence (a St. Cloud State alum and campus resident director from 1911 to 1921) and his wife Mary, Allen and Marjorie (children of Clarence and Mary Atwood), and Allen’s wife Ferne, a former St. Cloud State faculty member.

Architects Traynor and Hermanson were selected to design the first phase of Atwood Memorial Center. This phase of construction included Atwood’s main floor and ground floor. They also designed Phase II, which opened in April 1972. In fact, Atwood was always intended to be built in two phases.

Contractors for Phase I were Conlon Construction Company (general), $747,580; Cold Spring Electric, $108,488; St. Cloud Restaurant Supply, $79,737; St. Cloud Plumbing and Heating (plumbing), $48,840; McDowall Company (ventilation), $75,566; and Knapp Plumbing and Heating (heating), $104,340.

Groundbreaking ceremonies were held on October 10, 1964 and construction began soon after. Totaling 43,000 square feet, the doors to Atwood were opened in September 1966 in time for the start of the new academic year. The building was dedicated on November 4, 1967. Former St. Cloud State president George Budd, who left campus in the summer of 1965 for Pittsburg State University in Kansas, was part of the festivities.

The records are not clear whether or not St. Cloud State raised enough money, especially since the Minnesota state legislature did not provide funds to help construct Atwood Memorial Center.

Since Atwood Memorial Center was always intended to be built in two phases, steps were taken to plan for additional space soon after the building opened. According to a July 22, 1969 press release, the student union fee was raised from $5 to $10 per quarter to help finance Phase II.

Phase II included the building’s second floor (containing the art gallery, Little Theatre, and today’s Alumni Room) constructed over the gaming area, and the third floor (containing the ballroom and offices) constructed over the main floor. The ground floor game area was also expanded. Construction began in January 1971.

Designed by architects Traynor and Hermanson, the contractors for Phase II were George Madsen Construction (general), $1,037,500; Axel Newman Plumbing and Heating, $153,660; McDowall Company (ventilation), $167,100; Electric Motor Services, $181,342; and the St. Paul Bar and Restaurant Company (food service equipment), $71,188. The total cost of Phase II was $1.9 million.

A grand opening was spread over three days, April 7-9, 1972, to mark the completion of Phase II. The ballroom on the newly constructed third floor was used in early March 1972 for the inauguration banquet and ball for new St. Cloud State president Charles Graham.

On August 1, 1975, Minnesota state colleges became universities. Thus, “College” was dropped from Atwood Memorial College Center name.

Planning began in the late 1980s to expand the physical footprint of Atwood Memorial Center. Student enrollment increased from 10,697 in fall 1972 when Phase II opened to 16,551 students in the fall of 1989. Atwood was overcrowded. With 1st Avenue South shut off to traffic in 1974 to become the campus mall, the building was able to expand to the east. A $5.9 million renovation and expansion began with a groundbreaking ceremony on October 22, 1991. The work was to be done in two phases – first the expansion of the building, then the renovation of spaces inside.

Designed by Grooters Gary Architects of St. Cloud, the expansion increased the physical footprint of Atwood Memorial Center by one-third, equaling 40,000 square feet of new space. This space included a non-alcoholic nightclub and additional food service space in the basement, as well as included more lounge and office space, information desk, coffee shop, and convenience store on the main floor. Meeting rooms were added on the third floor. The work was possible by the sale of bonds paid for by students in the Minnesota state university system through activity fees. The grand opening for the addition was celebrated through a variety of activities during the week of April 19, 1993.

The early 1990s expansion was welcome, though in a July 15, 1992 article in the Chronicle, complaints arose about the color of brick used for part of the expansion. Steve Ludwig, who was part of the vice president for Administrative Affairs office, said that the brick could not be matched to the existing gray brick and the use of concrete was too expensive to match.

The final expansion of Atwood Memorial Center’s physical footprint began in the summer of 2003. Ground was broken for a 15,900 square feet addition to the west side of the building. The addition featured an expanded service area (TCF Bank, Campus Card office, Information desk, Copies Plus) on the main floor with a 300 person capacity room on the third floor (Cascade Room), and an expanded dining area in the basement. In addition, a skyway was built to connect the building to nearby Centennial Hall. The expansion opened in April 2004.

Funding for the 2004 Atwood Memorial Center expansion was paid for through a $16 million bond issue approved by students in November 2001. This bond approval set aside $5 million for an expansion of Atwood, $5 million toward the construction of Husky Stadium, and $6 million for a new campus recreational center. The increase cost students a maximum of an additional $4.50 fee per credit to raise the $16 million.

The blueprints for Atwood Memorial Center, as completed in 1966 and 1972, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Benton Hall (1967)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Architect's rendering of Benton Hall
Architect's rendering of Benton Hall

Benton Hall, ca. 1967-1968
Benton Hall, ca. 1967-1968

Benton Hall, 1967
Benton Hall, 1967

Benton Hall, 1968
Benton Hall, 1968

Aerial view of north side dormitory complex, 1977
Aerial view of north side dormitory complex, 1977

As the 1960s progressed and Baby Boomers were seeking a higher education, St. Cloud State’s physical campus continued to grow in leaps and bounds, especially student housing. Benton Student Residence was a shift – instead of a high-rise facility to house students, the complex provided apartment-style living and was St. Cloud State’s first co-ed dormitory.

The three story Benton Hall complex was built in two phases. The first phase, which opened in the fall of 1967, was built south and west of Ervin House to accommodate 200 students. Located just north of Ervin House, the second phase opened its doors in the fall of 1968 to accommodate 100 students.

Designed by architects Jackson-Hahn Associates, the $740,000 project went out for bid in the summer of 1966. Those awarded contracts were Wahl Construction Company (general), Erickson Electric (electrical), and Knapp Plumbing and Heating (mechanical). Benton Hall was financed through reserve bonds issued by the Minnesota State College board to be paid for through student rental fees.

According to the October 6, 1966, press release, men and women who were live in the complex were to be “selected on the basis of scholastic ability and maturity,” living in eight apartment-style units. In each unit, four students were to share a central bathroom, two bedrooms, and a living-study room.

Even before the first phase of Benton Hall was complete, plans were underway to begin construction of an addition that cost $400,000. Construction began in the fall of 1967. Designed again by architects Jackson-Hahn Associates, contracts were awarded to the Conlon Construction Company (general), Sporleders Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Erickson Electric (electrical). The addition opened in time for the 1968 fall term.

On April 1, 1967, the Minnesota state college board named the complex “Benton Student Residence.” Benton Hall was the second campus building to be named after a Minnesota county that St. Cloud State resides (the others are Stearns and Sherburne). The county itself was named in honor of, Thomas Benton, who served as a US Senator from Missouri from 1821 to 1854 and was author of the Homestead Act. In fact, the Benton Hall was to be named something else. At the January 11, 1966, meeting of the Minnesota state college board, St. Cloud State proposed to name the yet-to-be constructed building “Charlotte M. Knudson Student Residence” – and the resolution was tabled for unknown reasons. An 1897 graduate of St. Cloud State, Knudson served as a faculty member from 1913 to 1937. She passed away in 1953.

Along with Stearns Hall and Sherburne Hall, Benton Hall was dedicated on April 11, 1969.

Benton Hall was last occupied during the spring semester of 2017.

The blueprints for both phases of Benton Hall as it looked when it opened in 1967 and 1968 are available in the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Brown Hall (1960)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Joseph Brown
J.C. Brown, 1925

Model of Brown Hall
Model of Brown Hall

Brown Hall (1960)
Construction of Brown Hall (1958)

Construction of Brown Hall (1959)
Construction of Brown Hall (1959)

Brown Hall (1960)
Brown Hall (1960)

Brown Hall was the start of the tremendous physical growth of St. Cloud State University classrooms that began in the late 1950s. Before Brown Hall opened in January 1960, Stewart Hall was the only classroom and office building on campus. After Brown Hall was completed, many other buildings followed. Over the next 10 years, campus would change dramatically.

With $1.412 million from the 1957 Minnesota state legislature, construction began in September 1958, marking the start of the westward movement of campus from its traditional home along the Mississippi River. The Science and Mathematics building (it would be renamed in 1962) was to be three stories that occupied a half-block between 1st and 2nd Avenue South. A small greenhouse was to be attached to the building along with a bell shaped 250 person auditorium on the north side.

The building became the home of the departments of Chemistry, Biology, Physics, and Mathematics, as well as the sections for botany and geology. Inside were 29 laboratories and classrooms, nine research rooms, and 29 offices. The building also included an aviation workshop and a ramp entrance for handicapped students. Science equipment from Stewart Hall was moved here, including an additional $75,000 for more.

When the building opened in January 1960, it contained 78,965 square feet of space, about two-thirds the size of Stewart Hall. Brown Hall was to relieve student traffic by at least one-fourth from Stewart Hall, the only classroom building on campus.

The building was designed by Traynor and Hermanson. The general contractor was Gunner Johnson and Son.

On October 26, 1958, the Science and Mathematics building was dedicated, despite construction just starting. The building would officially open in January 1960.

In August 1962, the Minnesota State College Board renamed the building the "J.C. Brown Science and Mathematics Building." J.C. Brown was St. Cloud State's ninth president, serving from 1916 to 1927. It was the second space named after President Brown - the first was the J.C. Brown Athletic Field which stood just west of Shoemaker Hall.

The 2008 Minnesota state legislature appropriated $15 million to renovate Brown Hall to become the home of the Nursing program. The renovation was completed in 2010.

The blueprints for Brown Hall, as completed in 1960, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Case Hall (1964)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Marie Case
Marie Case visits Case Hall during construction

Case Hall (1960s)
Case Hall (1960s)

Case Hall construction (1963)
Case Hall construction (1963)

As the 1960s continued to roll on, the plans to expand campus were coming to fruition. The 1963 Minnesota state legislature approved several new campus buildings at St. Cloud State including a physical education building (Halenbeck Hall), a fine arts building (Performing Arts Center), maintenance and service building, and a new residence hall. That residence hall was Marie E. Case Hall, constructed under a plan to develop a residence hall complex on the north side of campus. Case Hall opened in September 1964 as a residence hall for men.

The funding for Case Hall was under a direct $3 million appropriation and $13 million available in a new bonding authority granted to the State College Board. The bonds were to be repaid from room rental income.

Bids for the new 200 bed, four story, fireproof brick and concrete building opened in August 1963. Winning bids were Wahl Construction Company (general), Johnson Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Allcity Electric Company (electrical). The bids totaled $590,010. The building was designed by Jackson-Hahn Associates and the consulting engineers were from Orr-Schelen-Mayeron and Associates.

Construction began in the late summer of 1963 and continued until the summer of 1964. The building shared a common lobby area with Hill Hall and, at the time, was a residence hall for women.

On November 22, 1963, the State College Board approved the name of the new dormitory – Marie E. Case Hall. Ms. Case served as a faculty member in the women’s physical education program at St. Cloud State from 1927 until her retirement in 1958.

Along with Holes Hall and Halenbeck Hall, Case Hall was dedicated on October 16, 1965.

In August 2012, Case Hall reopened after a renovation project that began the previous January. This $12.8 million project also renovated Hill Hall. Updates included wider doorways, larger bathrooms, improved kitchen facilities, a computer tech center, video surveillance, and card access.

The grand reopening of Case and Hill Halls was held on September 18, 2012.

The blueprints for Case Hall, as it was completed in 1964, are available on the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Eastman Hall (1930)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Architect's rendering of Eastman Hall, 1929
Architect's rendering of Eastman Hall, 1929

Eastman Hall, 1930

Eastman Hall, 1930

Alvah Eastman, ca. 1930

Alvah Eastman, ca. 1930

Eastman Hall, 1940s-1950s

Eastman Hall, 1940s-1950s

Eastman Hall pool, 1930

Eastman Hall pool, 1930

Basketball game at Eastman Hall, February 1964

Basketball game at Eastman Hall, February 1964

Eastman Hall Nautilus Center, January 1988

Eastman Hall Nautilus Center, January 1988

Eastman Hall gymnasium and east windows, January 1995

Eastman Hall gymnasium and east windows, January 1995

 

Eastman Hall was the first campus building constructed to house physical education. St. Cloud State was small enough that the Old Main building, which stood behind Stewart Hall, housed nearly all academic functions. The campus was slowly growing, both physically and academically. Statewide, educational offerings at Minnesota state colleges were expanding. The Minnesota state colleges began to offer four-year baccalaureate programs by the late 1920s, partly due to the increase of enrollment. Enrollment at St. Cloud State was expanding as well. At St. Cloud State in the fall of 1919 just after the end of World War I, 1,057 students attended, compared to the 1,649 students by the fall of 1930. Over just a 10-year period, enrollment increased by 35 percent. That enrollment increase fueled the expansion of the physical campus, resulting in the construction of Eastman Hall.

After two failed attempts, the 1929 Minnesota state legislature provided $225,000 “[f]or construction of physical education and classroom building and the acquisition by purchase or condemnation by the state teachers’ college board of such lands as the board shall determine to be necessary therefor, available for the year ending June 30, 1930”. The appropriation also provided for funds to purchase additional land to add to campus. Property was purchased from the campus boundary just south of Riverview to 10th Street South on the east side of 1st Avenue South. A home owned by J.E. Jenks stood on the property where Eastman Hall was to be constructed. The house was moved just south of the Eastman Hall site in the fall of 1929, renovated for $3000, and called “Music Studio” for use by St. Cloud State’s department of Music. The home was demolished in 1969.

According to an article in the "St. Cloud Times" on Nov. 7, 1929, construction began that day. The building was designed by Minnesota state architect Clarence Johnston, who also designed the second (and still standing) Lawrence Hall, the old Model School building (which stood just south of Old Main and demolished in 1960), Riverview and Shoemaker Hall. Designed in the Moorish style, Eastman Hall was the final campus building designed by Johnston. According to that same "St. Cloud Times" article, a special bid was provided for "the use of special Minnesota clay brick for the exterior." That brick would also be ornamented in a "diaper pattern" when the building was complete.

Construction contracts were awarded to A.G. Wahl and Sons (general), Charles Connor and Company (heating), and People’s Electrical Company (Electrical).

According to an article in the "St. Cloud Times" on Feb. 13, 1930, the cornerstone was laid the day before on Feb. 12. Presiding over the ceremony was St. Cloud State president George Selke. Minnesota state senator J.D. Sullivan, who helped secure the state appropriation, spoke at the cornerstone ceremony and praised the college and its soon to be completed physical education building, “[t]he standing of the St. Cloud College is of such character, and the work so beneficial that the mere suggestion of the need of this building several years ago should have been accepted as sufficient proof have its necessity.”

A time capsule in a small copper box was placed underneath the cornerstone. Inside the copper box contained a copy of the 1929 St. Cloud State "Talahi" yearbook, the final issue of the "St. Cloud Journal-Press", a copy of an article about homecoming in 1929 in the "St. Cloud Journal-Press", a history of St. Cloud State, a roster signed by every current St. Cloud State student, and a St. Cloud State course catalog. The copper box was sealed by faculty member Marie Case. “Motion pictures” were taken by L.L. Williams – the fate of that film is unknown.

Eastman Hall opened in September 1930. According to an article in the "St. Cloud Times" on Oct. 3, 1930, Eastman Hall was dedicated during homecoming that day. The dedication took place in Eastman Hall’s main gymnasium. That gymnasium seated 1,100 spectators, which included two balconies. The building also contained two side gymnasiums and locker rooms located below the main gymnasium. Eastman Hall also contained a 65 foot by 25 foot swimming pool that was finished with green and white tile, bringing a new sport on campus – swimming. With the opening of Eastman Hall, it would relieve overcrowding in the Old Main building and the campus library located in the Old Model School building. Classes for “psychology,” sociology, and composition were to be moved to Eastman Hall.

At the dedication, the building’s name was officially unveiled – Eastman Hall. It was named for Alvah Eastman, a prominent St. Cloud citizen who served as resident director twice, 1901-1908 and 1926-1933. A resident director served on the Minnesota state college board and represented the campus – Eastman served for St. Cloud State. Eastman also has owned and served as the editor the "St. Cloud Journal-Press" newspaper until 1929 when the paper merged with the "St. Cloud Times". When Eastman died in December 1939, he was referred to as “St. Cloud’s First Citizen”.

According to an article about the dedication from the Oct. 4, 1930 edition of the "St. Cloud Times", St. Cloud State president George Selke said of Eastman, “Throughout the many years since he first became director of the St. Cloud State Teachers college, Alvah Eastman has been its most valuable and most devoted friend. We honor the St. Cloud State Teachers college in naming its new physical education building for a man whose highest ambition has been the serving of this fellow man.” In response, Eastman said, “I’ll have to behave myself the rest of my life to live up to the reputation which has been given me here tonight.”

Besides providing classroom space, Eastman Hall served as the main home for physical education, including intercollegiate athletics. The first basketball game played at Eastman Hall occurred on Jan. 10, 1930. St. Cloud State defeated St. John’s University, 24-23. The last basketball game was played on Feb. 20, 1965. St. Cloud State defeated Moorhead State, 78-73. According to a press release dated Feb. 15, 1965, special guests were members of the 1930 St. Cloud State basketball team that played in that first game, including former head coach John Weismann, Edward Colletti, Malcolm Doane, and Gene Rengel.

According to an article in the Jan. 26, 1940 edition of the "College Chronicle", Health Services was first housed in Eastman Hall. Health Services moved to Hill Hall in the summer of 1973.

In the fall of 1946, according to an article in the November 22, 1946 edition of the "College Chronicle", the main gymnasium was the "temporary home of more than 100 veterans." The gym would soon be emptied in the next few days for basketball practice once the "new men's dormitory" (Brainard Hall) opened in the next few days.

More noticeable changes to Eastman Hall include the large west windows being closed up in the spring of 1963 to “eliminate sun glare.” Also done at that time was to replace the building’s four wooden doors with aluminum doors.

Halenbeck Hall opened in the summer of 1965 and became the new home for physical education. Eastman Hall would then serve as a fitness center, home for intramurals, faculty offices and classrooms. Art, Student Teaching, ROTC, and, especially, English, were housed in Eastman Hall after 1965. The building closed sometime in 2012.

The 2017 Minnesota state legislature provided $18.5 million for the renovation of Eastman Hall. When complete, Eastman Hall will be home to Health Services, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Human Performance Lab, and the U-Choose program. Renovation is slated to begin in the fall of 2017.

The blueprints for Eastman Hall, as completed in 1930, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Garvey Commons (1963)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Beth Garvey
Beth Porter Garvey in front of Garvey Commons (1964)

Construction of addition
Construction of addition (March 1987)

Garvey Commons during construction
Garvey Commons during construction (1963)

Garvey Commons (1963)
Garvey Commons (1963)

To accommodate a rapidly growing campus, St. Cloud State planned for a dedicated food service building. Designed by Frank Jackson and Associates, Garvey Commons consisted of a modern kitchen containing the “latest in food preparation and dishwashing equipment” on the ground level, a 56 by 100 foot dining room which sat 450 people, two food service counters, and a private dining room.

Garvey Commons was initially intended for commuter students and all women students living in St. Cloud State residence halls. It replaced the cafeteria located in the basement of Stewart Hall. Men living in St. Cloud State residence halls would continue to eat their meals at the Shoemaker Hall cafeteria. Garvey Commons, along with Hill Hall, were the first buildings of a new eight building residence hall complex to be located between 1st and 3rd Avenue South and 4th and 6th Street South.

Funds for the construction of Garvey Commons did not include tax money but instead Minnesota State College board bonds to be repaid from revenues earned. The first phase of construction cost $549,641.

Bids opened in March 1962 and excavation began in early April 1962. Contracts were awarded to Wahl Construction (general), St. Cloud Restaurant Supply (equipment), Knapp Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Granite City Electric Company (electrical).

Intended to open in December 1962, Garvey Commons served its first meal in June 1963.

Shortly after the building was opened in June 1963, the Minnesota State College Board officially named the building “Beth Porter Garvey Commons” at their June 17, 1963 meeting. Garvey arrived on campus in 1925 and retired in 1953. She was St. Cloud State’s first dean of women.

In a letters written to St. Cloud State president George Budd and to the Minnesota State College Board in June 1963, Garvey was very thankful for the building being named in honor of her service to the school.

Garvey Commons was dedicated during homecoming week on October 12, 1963. Other buildings dedicated at the same time were Headley Hall and Hill Hall. Two dining rooms were dedicated to honor the four Hayden sisters and three Joyner brothers who attended St. Cloud State between 1904 and 1922.

Planning began to construct an addition to Garvey Commons began soon after the building opened in 1963. The construction for the north addition, which cost $314,430, began in the summer of 1964 and was designed by Jackson-Rahn Associates. Contractors were Wahl Construction (general), Knapp Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Granite City Electric Company (electrical).

The new construction included two large dining rooms, additional serving lines, expansion of the dishwashing room, relocation of a staff lounge, and a bakery area. The addition opened in 1965.

Between February and August, 1987, Garvey Commons went through a complete renovation, construction of a west addition, and a new concourse to link the building with nearby Sherburne Hall. Designed by Fredric Wemlinger and Associates and built by Donlar Corporation, Garvey Commons would now able to sit 1,100 people at one time. The building was rededicated on October 19, 1987.

The blueprints for Garvey Commons, as it was completed in 1963 (and part of the plans for Hill Hall), and its 1987 renovation, are available on the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Gray Campus Laboratory School / Engineering and Computing Center (1958)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Thomas Gray
Thomas J. Gray

Girl weeping
A girl weeps after the final day of the Campus Laboratory School (May 27, 1983)

Construction (1958)
Construction (1958?)

Campus Lab School (1960s)
Thomas J. Gray Campus Laboratory School (1960s)

Engineering and Computing Center
Engineering and Computing Center (1980s)

The teaching of teachers has been a core function of St. Cloud State University. Founded in 1869, St. Cloud State was established to train teachers to teach in Minnesota public schools. And those teachers in training needed a place to observe “master” teachers teach children as well as have a place to do their own student teaching.

Several buildings at St. Cloud State has served as the campus “laboratory” school, dating back to 1869. The laboratory school was a fully functioning school with grades from kindergarten to 8th, sometimes more, depending on the time period. Run by St. Cloud State, the children received instruction from university faculty. The Thomas J. Gray Campus Laboratory School was the final building to hold that distinction. After the laboratory school closed in the spring of 1983, the building was soon renamed the Engineering and Computing Center and renovated a few years later.

With $800,000 appropriated by the state of Minnesota in 1955, construction began in July 1957. The building, which replaced Riverview as the building housing the laboratory school, did not obtain all of its funding to construct as designed. That funding would be received later and then used to fully complete the structure.

The building was designed by two firms – Traynor and Hermanson and Gausman and Moore. The building’s main contractor was Art Wahl and Son.

The laboratory school opened in time for the 1958 fall session and was simply called the "Campus Laboratory School." In August 1962, the Minnesota State College Board renamed the structure the “Thomas J. Gray Campus Laboratory School” in honor of Thomas Gray. Gray was the first alum to serve as president, graduating in 1872. Gray was hired as a faculty member the next year. Gray served two stints as president, including one as acting. Gray was acting president in the fall of 1881 and would be appointed permanently to the position in 1884, replacing Jerome Allen. Gray left St. Cloud State in 1890 to become president of the Greeley Normal School, now the University of Northern Colorado.

In 1959, a year after the building opened, the Minnesota State Legislature appropriated additional funds to complete the building. Designed by Traynor and Hermanson, construction for the addition began in May 1961. Opened in time for the 1962 fall session, the $283,413 addition included a gymnasium and allied art area, dressing rooms, two physical education offices, two conference rooms, equipment storage, and industrial arts and arts areas.

The contractors for the 1962 addition were Kratochvil and Company (general), Erickson Electrical Service (electrical), Phil Thometz and Son (plumbing and ventilating), and St. Cloud Plumbing and Heating (heating).

The building was dedicated on October 26, 1958 along with Mitchell Hall and Math and Science building (later named Brown Hall).

The Thomas J. Gray Campus Laboratory School closed in the spring of 1983. Though the training of teachers was still part of the overall university curriculum, St. Cloud State would no longer operate its own laboratory school. In late 1983, the building was referred to as the “Engineering and Computing Center” and slated for a renovation. The renovation was to turn the building into thea home for the academic departments of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics and Statistics, as well as for Academic Computer Services and the Child Care Center.

Renovation and construction for the new addition, designed by Pauly and Olsen Associates / Traynor, Hermanson, and Hahn, began in August 1985 and was completed in time for the 1986 fall quarter. The building was remodeled as well as had a new two story north wing added. This wing contained 52 additional offices. The general contractor was Donlar Construction.

In addition to the new structure for offices and general renovation, engineering labs and individual faculty labs were built, windows added to the gymnasium, and wiring upgraded.

The building was dedicated once more, but this time as the Engineering and Computing Center, on September 12, 1986.

Additional Sources

Other sources used include: Chronicle articles on January 22, 1957, April 30, 1957, April 29, 1958, October 21, 1958, June 22, 1983, November 4, 1983, and July 24, 1985.

Halenbeck Hall (1965)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Architect's rendering of Halenbeck Hall
Architect's rendering of Halenbeck Hall

Philip Halenbeck
Philip L. Halenbeck

Halenbeck Hall groundbreaking
Halenbeck Hall groundbreaking (September 9, 1963)

Halenbeck Hall (1970s)
Halenbeck Hall, 1970s

The 1960s saw a great increase of the intellectual and physical presence at St. Cloud State. “Baby Boomers” flocked to campus to get an education and, in response, new campus facilities were built to accommodate the changes that were happening. Physical education was not immune to that growth. The 1963 Minnesota state legislature approved several new campus buildings at St. Cloud State including a fine arts building (Performing Arts Center), a maintenance and service building, a new residence hall (Case Hall), and a $2.2 million physical education building. Opened in June of 1965, the Philip L. Halenbeck Hall replaced Eastman Hall, increasing the amount of space used for the teaching of physical education as well as provide a larger home to many of St. Cloud State’s athletic programs. Eastman Hall opened in 1929.

On February 24, 1964, the Minnesota state college board named the building in honor of Dr. Philip L. Halenbeck, a local physician. According to a February 25, 1964 press release, Halenbeck provided funds for St. Cloud State’s first academic scholarships, helped conduct the school’s first major fundraising campaign (to build Atwood Memorial Center, which opened in 1966), and financed “the research required for planning closed-circuit and educational television facilities at the college.” The building was designed by architects Traynor and Hermanson.

According to an August 16, 1963 press release, the main portion of the building was to contain two handball courts, storage rooms, two classrooms, gymnastics room, wrestling room, dance studio, and a main gymnasium with pull out bleachers to seat 8000 fans. The south end of the building was to house an Olympic size swimming pool, an adjacent diving pool and bleachers to seat 500 fans, as well as a training room, first aid room, lockers, team rooms, offices, staff conference rooms, lounge, general office, seminar room, and four classrooms.

Bids were awarded in the summer of 1963: Conlin Construction Company (general), Cold Spring Electric (electrical), Knapp Plumbing and Heating (plumbing), McDowall Company (ventilation and heating), and Haldeman and Homme (bleachers), totaling just under $2 million. After the remaining homes at the site were to demolished or moved, construction on the building began in August 1963. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on September 9, 1963.

Halenbeck Hall opened in June 1965, hosting commencement ceremonies for St. Cloud’s Tech High School on June 3 and St. Cloud State on June 11, 1965.

Along with Case Hall and Holes Hall, Halenbeck Hall was dedicated on October 16, 1965.

A south addition to Halenbeck Hall opened in the fall of 1980 that provided for 86,900 square feet of further physical education space. Designed by architects Sovik, Mathre, Sathum, and Quanbeck, the Donlar Construction Company was hired to build the addition. $4.7 million for the Halenbeck Hall addition was approved by the 1979 Minnesota state legislature. Construction began in the summer of 1979. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on August 8, 1979.

According to a November 12, 1980 press release, the $5 million addition included “an activity center bordered by a 200-meter, six-lane running track and multiple-purpose area covered by a composition floor, 30 feet below the roof. The center of the track measured 160 feet by 300 feet long, which also contained a system of suspended nets to separate various activities. The addition also included six regulation size racquetball courts, a wrestling practice room, intramural offices, and human performance facility. Also included were second floor locker rooms and six women’s athletic team rooms, as well as three third floor classrooms, nine faculty offices, and two conference rooms.

The south addition was dedicated on December 2, 1980. The dedication speaker was St. Cloud native and prominent Minnesotan Wheelock Whitney.

Architecturally, Halenbeck Hall is a prime example of Late-Modern, a style identified by the use of reinforced concrete, brick, a minimum of ornamentation and rectilinear, slab-like forms. Doors on the east and west walls are beneath four Gothicized hoods, the only ornamental features found on the entire building and may have been intentionally designed to reflect the Gothic hoods found around windows on many late 19th century homes in St. Cloud.  The east and west walls also contain three cave-like entrances rendered in concrete. One can see where the imprints were left when the wooden forms were removed after the concrete was poured and considered an aesthetic element in Late-Modern style.

The blueprints for Halenbeck as it looked when the building opened June 1965 and for the south addition of Halenbeck Hall, as it was completed in 1980, are available on the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Headley Hall (1963)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

John W. Headley
John W. Headley

Architect's rendering of Headley Hall
Architect's rendering of Headley Hall (1961)

Headley Hall during construction
Headley Hall during construction (1962)

Headley Hall (1963)
Headley Hall (April 1963)

Headley Hall opened in April 1963 to serve as the new home for the departments of Industrial Arts and Art. Officially named by the Minnesota State College board on August 17, 1962, as the “John W. Headley Industry and Art” building, it honored John Headley, who served as St. Cloud State president from 1947 through the end of 1951. Headley, who also was president of today’s Mayville State University in North Dakota from 1945 to 1947, left St. Cloud State in 1952 to become president at South Dakota State University. He died in a 1957 hunting accident.

With an appropriation of $950,000 approved by the Minnesota state legislature in 1959, planning for the 34,500 square foot building began in the spring of 1961. According to an April 21, 1961 press release, the first floor was to contain “a woodworking shop, graphic arts room, bookstore, electricity, electronics and power shop, ham radio facilities, two metal shops, lobby and display area, two lecture rooms, finishing room, storage room, research laboratory, and eight offices.”

The second floor was to include “two pre-engineering drawing rooms, two conference rooms, a lobby and display area, a large lecture hall and a small lecture room, an art studio, an art education room, ceramics and sculpture room, a gallery and gallery storage room, nine offices, and general office, and a handicrafts and crafts room joined by a machine work room.”

Preparations to the property began in the summer of 1961. According to a May 17, 1961 press release, 20 homes were being sold by auction, which included removal from the property, demolition of the foundation, filling in of the basement, and clearing of site debris.

Designed by the St. Cloud firm of Frank Jackson and Associates, contractors to construct Headley Hall were hired in October 1961. According to a November 1, 1961 press release, Wahl Construction Company won the bid for general contractor, Knapp Plumbing and Heating for the mechanical work, and Granite City Electrical Company for the electrical. The bids amounted to $717,527, less than the appropriation. Construction began shortly afterwards and continued through 1962.

Headley Hall opened in April 1963. According to an article in the April 11, 1963 edition of the College Chronicle, the building was only partially open – the Department of Art began using their portion of the building while Industrial Arts was to move in shortly as Headley Hall was finished. For art, Headley Hall was significant. It finally provided appropriate classroom and display space for art students to learn and exhibit creative works.

Headley Hall, along with Garvey Commons and Hill Hall, were officially dedicated during homecoming week on October 12, 1963.

Sources

Hill Hall (1962)

Images

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Helen Hill
Helen Hill

Hill Hall (1962)
Hill Hall (October 1962)

Hill Hall construction (1961)
Hill Hall construction (October 1961)

Hill Hall construction (1961)
Hill Hall construction (November 1961)

Proposed residence hall complex
Proposed residence hall complex (June 1, 1962)

As St. Cloud State began its skyrocketing growth in the 1960s, administrators started to plan for the influx of incoming freshmen. Hill Hall, which opened in September 1962, was to be the first of a new eight building residence hall complex located between 1st and 3rd Avenue South and 4th and 6th Street South that would accommodate 1200 students.

On June 16, 1961, the Minnesota State College Board approved plans for a 200 bed women's residence hall. Designed by Frank Jackson and Associates, the four story structure was financed through Minnesota State College Board bonds to be repaid from revenues earned from room rentals. No tax money was used. At the time of the board's approval of the building, homes bordered by 5th and 6th Street South and 2nd and Third Avenue South were acquired to begin construction of Hill Hall and for future development of the residence hall complex.

In August 1961, thirteen homes and ten garages, acquired from the property where Hill Hall (and later Case Hall) was to be built, were sold at auction. Bids for these structures were to include removing the building from the property, demolishing the foundation, filling the basement, and clearing debris from the site.

Contractors were hired in September 1961 to construct the four-story fireproof brick and reinforced concrete structure. Contractors included Wahl Construction (general), Knapp Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Electric Motor Service (electrical). Excavation for Hill Hall began the next month.

Construction also included a commons area at the northeast corner of 3rd Avenue South and 4th and 6th Street South. Case Hall would later connect to this commons area.

On June 18, 1962, the Minnesota State College Board named the building in honor of Helen Hill. Hill served as a faculty member at St. Cloud State between 1915 and 1952. Hill Hall opened in September 1962.

Hill Hall and Case Hall, which opened in 1964, were the only buildings constructed from an early residence hall plan - see the image below that appeared in the College Chronicle on June 1, 1962. Of the eight proposed buildings, which all were to look alike, only Hill Hall and Case Hall were built.

Hill Hall would later serve an additional purpose - the new home for Health Services. Health Services, which was previously located in Eastman Hall, opened its doors on Hill Hall's main floor on July 30, 1973. This also included a pharmacy with a full-time pharmacist, a first for Health Services. Health Services were obligated to pay $11,200 in rent, the cost of what 45 students would have paid if those rooms had been rented..

In August 2012, Hill Hall reopened after a renovation project that began the previous January. This $12.8 million project also renovated Case Hall. Updates included wider doorways, larger bathrooms, improved kitchen facilities, a computer tech center, video surveillance, and card access. During the renovation, Health Services moved temporarily to Shoemaker Hall and returned to Hill Hall in time for the 2012/13 academic year.

The grand reopening of Case and Hill Halls was held on September 18, 2012.

The blueprints for Hill Hall, as it opened in 1962, are available in the University Archives' Archon portal. The blueprints also include Garvey Commons.

Additional Sources

Holes Hall (1965)

Images

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Building dedication ceremony
Building dedication ceremony with Robert Wick, Marie Case, Wilbur Holes, and Philip Halenbeck, October 16, 1965

Wilbur H. Holes
Wilbur W. Holes (1956)

Holes Hall
Holes Hall (1970s)

Architect's rendering of Holes Hall
Architect's rendering of Holes Hall (1964)

As the 1960s progressed and Baby Boomers were seeking a higher education, St. Cloud State’s physical campus continued to grow in leaps and bounds, especially student housing. Two new dormitories Hill Hall (1962) and Case Hall (1964) were built since 1962 and Shoemaker Hall, originally opened in 1915, got a 400 bed addition to its south end. Construction continued to house the large and increasingly growing student body at St. Cloud State. The next residence hall to open was Holes Hall.

On September 19, 1964, the Minnesota state college board named the residence hall in honor of local businessman Wilbur W. Holes. Holes served as St. Cloud State’s resident director, representing the school at the state college board from 1947 to 1958. He was instrumental in developing the revenue bond financing plan at Minnesota state colleges, which helped fund construction at other state college campuses. Holes Hall was no exception – the building was funded through “self-liquidating revenue bonds, not state funds.” These bonds were to be repaid from room rental income.

Holes Hall was also a departure from student residence plans at St. Cloud State at the time. Plans were circulated as late as November 1963 to make future residence halls look all the same and be in a set pattern – see Hill Hall and Case Hall. But by the time Holes Hole went out to bid in May 1964, those plans had changed. A reason given appeared in a July 17, 1964 press release that stated the high rise building of nine stories was to be built “for economy of space and maximum use of land.” An architect’s rendering of the building, which appeared in the July 28, 1964 edition of the Chronicle, gave a look at what it would look like when completed. It was the first high-rise residence hall built at St. Cloud State.

Designed by Jackson-Hahn Associates, construction was scheduled to begin in late July 1964. With a budget of $1.2 million, Wahl Construction Company commenced its work as the general contractor. Other contractors included Sporleder Heating and Plumbing and Granite City Electric.

Construction lasted just over a year and Holes Hall opened in September 1965 in time for the new academic year. Containing 400 beds for female students, each of the upper eight floors contained 26 double bedrooms and a study room. In addition, each floor also had a central bathroom and laundry, plus the hallways were completely carpeted. While the upper eight floors housed students, the first floor served as a commons that contained offices, lounge with a television, and recreation room.

Before Holes Hall was completed, work began on a new nearly identical building nearby. Stearns Hall opened in the fall of 1966 that also contained 400 beds.

Along with Case Hall and Halenbeck Hall, Holes Hall was dedicated on October 16, 1965.

With the opening of Holes Hall in the fall of 1965, St. Cloud State increased its on-campus housing capacity to 2,050 to serve a student population of 6,169 students, up over a 1000 students from the fall of 1964. Total enrollment had doubled since 1959.

Holes Hall completely closed in the fall of 2014 and was demolished in June 2016.

The blueprints for Holes Hall as it looked when it opened in 1965 are available in the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Resources

Additional Images

Lawrence Hall (1885)

Images

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Isabel Lawrence
Isabel Lawrence

Lawrence Hall (1900)
Lawrence Hall (ca. 1900)

Lawence Hall dorm room
Lawrence Hall dorm room (1903)

Lawrence Hall after fire
Lawrence Hall after fire (1905)

There are very few St. Cloud State buildings that no longer are standing – and only one that met its fate through disaster. The first Lawrence Hall, which opened in the fall of 1885, was that one building. It stood on the same site of the second Lawrence Hall, the oldest standing campus building today, which opened in December 1905.

The first St. Cloud State residential hall, initially named “Ladies Home,”  was the campus’ first building constructed as a student residence. It replaced the Stearns House, which, upon the opening of the Old Main building in 1874, served as the campus residential hall. Stearns House was St. Cloud State’s first building when the school opened in 1869. At the February 25, 1899 meeting of the Minnesota State Normal Board, the building was renamed "Lawrence Hall" in honor of faculty member and, later, acting president, Isabel Lawrence. It was the first St. Cloud State building named in honor of an individual.

The 1883 Minnesota state legislature appropriated $10,000 for construction of Lawrence Hall. It is not known who designed or constructed Lawrence Hall, which was done in the Venetian Renaissance architectural style. The 1886/87 St. Cloud State course catalog described the building in depth: “built of cream-colored brick, three stories in height, 105 feet in length and 65 feet in depth, in the form of an L.” The catalog brags that the building “affords the best accommodations to seventy-five young ladies, and can furnish day-board to fifty more ladies…,” continuing that the “nearness of the Home to the school makes it peculiarly desirable during the winter months, saving a long walk through the cold and snow.”

The building was heated and ventilated “by the most perfect system known to architects – the Ruttan system,” which allowed temperature in each room to be between 68 and 70 degrees and “all of the air in each room is changed as often as every 20 minutes.” This system did away with fires in each room, “rendering the building practically fire proof.”

Unfortunately, the first Lawrence Hall was completely destroyed by fire on Saturday afternoon, January 14, 1905. Luckily, none of the 200 residents were killed and only a few injuries, including those of the firemen fighting the fire, were reported.

According to the article that appeared in Monday, January 16, 1905 edition of the St. Cloud Daily Times, the fire was reported 4:25pm on the building’s roof. St. Cloud State president Waite Shoemaker speculated that the fire began in a defective flue. Despite the effort of the firemen, the roof collapsed and the building could no longer be saved. Efforts were then focused on ensuring the safety of nearby buildings. 60 tons of coal in the basement “helped prolong the fire.”

The building was a total loss and was valued at $25,000. The contents were valued at $6,000. Lawrence Hall was insured for $15,000.

The St. Cloud community quickly acted to help the women displaced by the fire. Nearby St. Cloud residents took in all of the women and $1500 were raised to assist. The state of Minnesota acted as well – the legislature passed a bill in late March 1905 appropriating $50,000 for the construction of new residence hall to replace the gutted Lawrence Hall. Minnesota state architect Charles Johnston completed the plans for the “new” Lawrence Hall in early May 1905 (his first St. Cloud State campus building) and O’Neill and Son of Faribault, Minnesota, were named as general contractor on May 27, 1905. Work started two days later to remove the remains of the gutted dormitory and begin construction of the new.

According to the December 20, 1905 edition of the St. Cloud Daily Times, women began to move into the new Lawrence Hall that day, less than a year after the first Lawrence Hall was destroyed by fire. The building was dedicated on June 12, 1906 in conjunction with spring commencement activities that featured Minnesota governor J.A. Johnson.

Interested in more information about the later Lawrence Hall? Check out that profile below!

Additional Sources

Lawrence Hall (1905)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Isabel Lawrence
Isabel Lawrence

Lawrence Hall (1906)
Lawrence Hall (1906)

Lawence Hall dorm room
Lawrence Hall dorm room (1907)

Lawrence Hall with new cupola (2004)
Lawrence Hall with new cupola (2004)

Opened in December 1905 as a residence hall, Lawrence Hall is the oldest standing campus building at St. Cloud State. It is named in honor of faculty member and, later, acting president, Isabel Lawrence, the second building to hold that distinction. The first building, also known as Lawrence Hall, opened in 1885 as the Ladies Home and renamed in 1899 in honor of Isabel Lawrence.

Lawrence Hall stands on the site of the first Lawrence Hall. That building was destroyed by fire on January 14, 1905. No one perished in the fire, but the building and its contents were a complete loss.

The state of Minnesota acted quickly to replace the residence hall – the legislature passed a bill in late March 1905 appropriating $50,000 for the construction of new residence hall to replace the gutted Lawrence Hall. Minnesota state architect Clarence Johnston completed the plans for the “new” Lawrence Hall in early May 1905 (his first St. Cloud State campus building) and O’Neill and Son of Faribault, Minnesota, were named as general contractor on May 27, 1905. Work started two days later to remove the remains of the destroyed structure and construction of the new.

According to the December 20, 1905 edition of the St. Cloud Daily Times, women began to move into the new Lawrence Hall that day, less than a year after the first Lawrence Hall was destroyed by fire. The building was dedicated on June 12, 1906 in conjunction with spring commencement activities that featured Minnesota governor J.A. Johnson.

According to an article that appeared in the St. Cloud Daily Daily Journal-Press on June 13, 1905 (which reported on the building’s dedication), the four storied, 180 foot long, and 50 foot wide building with 32,000 square feet of flooring was home to 150 women and  made of reddish brock with gray granite trimmings, and contained a basement dining room that sat 200. 100,000 pressed bricks, 600,000 common bricks, 90 cords of stone, 1200 loads of sand, 25,000 hollow tile, and 30,000 feet of Georgia pine flooring were used in its construction.

For much of its history, Lawrence Hall did serve as a residence hall but also served other purposes. According to the March 3, 1943 edition of the Chronicle, the 72nd College Training Detachment arrived on campus in very early March and used Lawrence Hall as its barracks. Due to a shortage of space, the U.S. government contracted with colleges and universities across the country to provide facilities and training for air cadets.  The detachment moved out in time for the fall 1944 academic term – Lawrence Hall then returned to housing women students.

Starting in the fall of 1969, Lawrence Hall no longer housed students. According to a July 9, 1969 press release, the building was converted to faculty offices. The newly opened 14-story Sherburne Hall would house students that had resided in Lawrence Hall. The building would continue to provide office space until 1999.

Plans were in works for the building to be renovated in the 1980s. A press release from September 28, 1989 stated that the Minnesota State University System board approved a request for Lawrence Hall to be renovated  rather than the construction of a new 350 bed resident Hall on the university’s northwest side. Renovation would have to wait. Not until 2001 did the state of Minnesota legislature appropriate funds to modernize the building.

A yearlong $6.4 million renovation began in the summer of 2002. When the renovated Lawrence Hall opened in the fall of 2003, it housed 100 international students as well as the Center for International Studies and the department of Foreign Languages and Literature. The renovation also added a cupola, which concealed the newly installed elevator shaft.

Lawrence Hall was rededicated on August 28, 2003.

The building is Georgian Revival in style, a style that adheres to rigid symmetry and elements borrowed from Greek, Roman, and Renaissance architecture. It was built using red, pressed-brick and granite trim. On the eastern coast of the United States, this style reflected the classical education that served as a bedrock for a liberal education. These styles spread westward and found homes on campuses everywhere. Its 2003 restoration is a fine example of contemporary restoration work.

The blueprints for Lawrence Hall, as completed in 1905, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Interested in more information about the earlier Lawrence Hall? Check out that profile above!

Additional Sources

Mitchell Hall (1958)

Images

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William B. Mitchell
William B. Mitchell

Mitchell Hall construction
Mitchell Hall construction (1958)

The children of William B. Mitchell at the dedication of Mitchell Hall, October 26, 1958
The children of William B. Mitchell at the dedication of Mitchell Hall (October 26, 1958)

Mitchell Hall, 1960s
Mitchell Hall (1960s)

Architect's rendering of Mitchell Hall, 1956?
Architect's rendering of Mitchell Hall (1956?)

When Mitchell Hall opened its doors in September 1958, it was the first new campus dormitory built since Shoemaker Hall in 1915. Mitchell Hall was the start of St. Cloud State's expansion for the housing of its students. By 1970, nearly all of today's current residence halls were completed.

State financing was made available in 1955 to construct the building, but not as planned. In 1957, the financing was adjusted that allowed a planned wing to be constructed to the unfinished building. The cost of the initial construction cost $893,709 while the estimated cost of the addition was $552,897.

The building and its addition was designed by Frank W. Jackson and Associates. Contractors included Art Wahl and Son (general), Sporleder Heating and Plumbing (mechanical), and Erickson Electrical Service (electrical).

Construction began on the unnamed dormitory in the fall of 1956 on the site of the old Mitchell House, home of William B. Mitchell and his large family. Mitchell had deep connections with St. Cloud State, serving as resident director to the Minnesota State College Board from 1877 to 1901. To honor Mitchell's service to St. Cloud State as well as acknowledge the site where the family home stood, the State College Board on May 13, 1957 authorized that the building be named the William B. Mitchell Hall.

In 1934, Al Sirat, a local men's social fraternity, moved into the Mitchell family home. Al Sirat moved out shortly before the home was demolished in April 1938. In 1965, Al Sirat became Theta Chi.

Construction of the wing on the north side of the building, running east to west, began in July 1958. It opened in time for the fall of 1959.

When Mitchell Hall opened its doors in the fall of 1958, it housed 215 female students. With the new addition finished in time for the fall of 1959, the building housed over 400 students. Each 12 x 16 foot room was equipped with built-in wardrobes, dressers, occasional chairs, "Hollywood" beds, and beige drapes. Each floor had a modern lounge with a television, piano, magazine racks, tables, and chairs, as well as a small kitchen. Mitchell Hall also contained a first floor lounge as well as a snack bar on the ground floor open to the entire campus, rapidly becoming the "unofficial student center" (Atwood Memorial Center would not open until 1966.).

Mitchell Hall was dedicated on October 26, 1958, along with the completed Campus Laboratory School and the still under construction Science-Mathematics Building (later renamed Brown Hall). The children of William B. Mitchell, six daughters and one son, were present at the dedication.

Until 1980, Mitchell Hall was solely for female students, the last residence hall to be segregated. It became co-ed that fall.

The blueprints for Mitchell Hall as it looked when it opened in 1958 are available in the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Other sources used include: Chronicle articles on September 14, 1934, April 29. 1938, October 9, 1956, October 16, 1956, April 2, 1957, May 13, 1958, September 16, 1958, October 21, 1958, October 28, 1958, and April 4, 1980.

Performing Arts Center (1968)

Images

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Performing Arts Center
Architect's rendering of the Performing Arts Center, 1967

Mitchell Hall construction
Performing Arts Center construction, ca. 1967

Aerial view of Performing Arts Construction, 1967
Aerial view of Performing Arts Construction, 1967

Performing Arts Center, 1980s?
Performing Arts Center, 1980s?

Though the construction of student residence halls in the 1960s was the main phase of the expansion at the St. Cloud State campus, classrooms were added as well.  A major need was fulfilled for the burgeoning music and theatre programs when St. Cloud State proposed, received funding, and built a fine arts building, the Performing Arts Center. 

Thanks to bills passed by the 1963 Minnesota state legislature, $1.7 million was appropriated to construct a fine arts building. In addition, funds were provided for what would become Halenbeck Hall, a heating and maintenance building, and Case Hall, as well as for property acquisition for future expansion of campus. Additional funding was provided by the federal government, which pushed the funds available to $2.5 million.

Designed by architects by the Walter Butler and Engineering Company and Haarstick, Lundgren and Associates, construction began in the fall of 1966. Contracts were awarded to Gunnar I. Johnson Company (general) for $1.36 million, Granite City Electric (electrical) for $275,904, Sporleders Heating and Plumbing (mechanical) for $211,450, and Weidner's Plumbing (ventilation) for $187,000.

According to a press release from September 29, 1966, the nearly 76,500 square foot building would feature a 500 seat main theatre with a turntable stage that permitted scenery to be changed on one side while a performance was happening on the other.  Also included were a box office, concessions area, check room, orchestra pit, scene shop, dressing rooms, wardrobe room, makeup room, a modern light and sound control system, and a studio theatre with 200 portable seats. In addition, there was a debate room, recording and listening room, and choral and band rehearsal rooms, which have access to a 200 seat recital-lecture hall.  There also would be a large piano classroom, 20 piano practice rooms, faculty offices, and a radio-television studio with a control and equipment room and a radio room.

The Performing Arts Center opened in April 1968 with the "Region V" high school music contest that featured 1500 area high school musicians.

On November 20, 1967, the Minnesota state college board named the structure “Performing Arts Building".  It is unknown why "Building" was dropped for "Center".  It happened relatively quickly - the January 12, 1969 dedication program calls the building "Performing Arts Center".  As with other campus buildings constructed in the 1960s, there was another name proposed for the Performing Arts Center.  At the January 11, 1966, meeting of the Minnesota state college board, St. Cloud State proposed to name the yet-to-be constructed building “George F. Budd Hall” – and the resolution was tabled for unknown reasons. Budd served as St. Cloud State president from 1952 to 1965.

On January 12, 1969, the Performing Arts Center was dedicated. The dedication address was given by former St. Cloud State president George Budd. Budd left St. Cloud State in 1965 to become president of Kansas State College of Pittsburg (now known as Pittsburg State University).

The blueprints for the Performing Arts Center as it looked when it opened in 1968 are available in the University Archives' Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Riverview (1913)

Images

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Riverview, 1916
Riverview (1916)

First floor of Riverview, ca. 1915
First floor of Riverview (ca. 1915)

Riverview classroom, 1918
Riverview classroom (1918)

St. Cloud State opened as a Minnesota state "normal" school in 1869. Its primary purpose was to train teachers to teach in Minnesota public schools. Today, the university no longer has a single focus on training teachers, but it still remains an important part of its currciulum.

Several buildings at St. Cloud Sate have served as the campus "laboratory" school, dating back to 1869. The laboratory school was a fully functioning school with grades from kindergarten to 8th, sometimes more, depending on the time period. Teachers in-training would observe "master" teachers teach children as well as have a place to do their own student teaching.

Riverview, which opened in the fall of 1913, served as St. Cloud State's campus laboratory school until the fall of 1958. The Old Model School, which opened in a few years earlier in 1906 and stood just north of Riverview, became St. Cloud State's library.

It is unknown why St. Cloud State needed a new model school so soon after it had just built one. Yet planning began for Riverview by at least early 1911, likely even earlier. The 1911 Minnesota state legislature appropriated to St. Cloud State $65,000 to construct a new "model" school, as well as $17,200 to be used partly for the acquisition of property that the new building would be located.

Built with common local yellow brick, the Clarence Johnston-designed building served as the campus laboratory school until the fall of 1958 when the Thomas J. Gray Campus Laboratory School opened. The school would close in 1983. Riverview became the home of the Division of Languages and Literature and, later, the department of English until 2008.

In 1989, faculty member Bill Morgan led the effort for the building to be placed on Minnesota's National Register of Historic Places. The application can be viewed at http://focus.nps.gov/pdfhost/docs/nrhp/text/88003072.pdf.

In January 2001, the cupola was removed from the roof of Riverview. The cupola returned in March 2002, but was an exact replica using modern materials.

After a $6.2 million total renovation was completed in 2009, Riverview is now the home for the department of Communication Studies. The renovation won a Restoration/Rehabilitation Award from the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota in 2010.

Riverview is a fine example of Georgian Revival. Riverview has bays or pavilions at either end of the building. Following typical mathematical perfection, the façade is divided into three parts.

The blueprints for Riverview, as it was completed in 1913, are available on the Minnesota Digital Library's web portal Minnesota Reflections.

Sources used include:

Minnesota State College Board minutes for February 14, 1911, May 6, 1911, June 6, 1911, and June 19, 1913; 1911 Minnesota State Legislative Session, Laws, Chapter 28, St. Cloud Times, January 21, 2001 (cupola), and St. Cloud Times, March 15, 2002 (cupola)

Additional Image

School of Business / 51 Building (1968)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Architect's rendering of the School of Business building
Architect's rendering of the School of Business building, 1967

School of Business building construction, 1968
School of Business building construction, 1968

Dedication of School of Business building, 1969
Jim Marmas and Robert Wick prepare cornerstone, 1969

School of Business building, 1970s

School of Business building, 1970s

As the 1960s came to close, so did St. Cloud State’s rapid physical expansion of campus. The School of Business building, constructed to house the fast growing School of Business, was one of the last campus buildings to open before 1970. After the Business moved out in 2007 for the newly renovated Centennial Hall, the building was renamed 51 Building.

Designed by architects Traynor and Hermanson, construction for the Business Building began in September 1967 and on the site where the Old Main building stood. Costing $1.026 million, the majority of the funds for the project ($825,000) was provided for by the 1965 Minnesota state legislation. The remaining funds were provided for by the federal government. Construction contracts were awarded to Gunnar I. Johnson and Son (general) for $719,000, St. Cloud Plumbing and Heating (mechanical) for $130,740, Sporleders Plumbing and Heating (ventilating) for $77,390, and M-J-B (electrical) for $99,652.

According to a press release dated August 18, 1967, the three story building was to house four Business school departments – Accounting, Management and Finance, Marketing and General Business, and Business Education and Office Administration. It would also be the home to the Bureau of Business Research. Measuring 78 feet by 166 feet, the building would include classrooms, seminar rooms, and offices. The Business building also included “provisions for educational television transmittal and reception and dial information access to the campus library, computer center, and secretarial service,” as well as a climate control system, entrance ramp and elevator for handicapped students, and flexible construction that allowed interior walls to be moved easily and economically to change room sizes. Just as important, the building design would allow an addition to be added when needed.

In the end, the 48,174 square foot building contained 39 faculty offices, offices for the Business dean, and space for the Bureau of Business Research. Five carpeted riser-type classrooms with capacities for 31 to 100 students were included, as were nine general purpose classrooms, five special purpose classrooms, and three seminar rooms.

On November 20, 1967, the Minnesota state college board named the building “School of Business”. The suggestion for the building's name came from the Business faculty themselves. As with other campus buildings completed in the 1960s, the Business building was to be named something else. At the Jan. 11, 1966, meeting of the Minnesota state college board, St. Cloud State proposed to name the yet-to-be constructed building “L.K. McLeland Hall” in honor of former St. Cloud State resident director and St. Cloud businessman Lyle K. McLeland. The resolution was tabled for unknown reasons.

Opening in the fall of 1968, the Business building was dedicated on May 14, 1969.

A movement began in the early 1990s to construct an addition to the Business building. According to a Feb. 15, 1991 press release, the two story addition to the southwest side of the Business building would provide an additional 5,000 square feet for 25 to 30 offices. The addition was to be designed by Wemlinger Architecture.  To cost around $465,000, the addition would be funded by a loan from the St. Cloud State Foundation. Yet it is unclear when construction started, how it was funded, who designed the addition, who did the construction, how much the addition cost, and when exactly it opened. According to an article that appeared in the May 2, 1995 edition of the Chronicle, the addition was designed by students of the professional business fraternity Delta Sigma Pi and Buildings and Grounds employees and may have opened in the spring of 1994. The addition was dedicated on April 29, 1995.

In mid-2007, the now Herberger College of Business moved from the building to the newly renovated Centennial Hall. The former School of Business building was then renovated to become home for the departments of English, Political Science, and Ethnic and Women's Studies. 

An unsuccessful effort was made in 2007 to rename the building after former St. Cloud State president George Budd. Sometime late during the 2007-08 academic year, the structure was dubbed 51 Building.

The blueprints for the School of Business / 51 Building, as completed in 1968, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Sherburne Hall (1969)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Sherburne Hall, March 1969
Sherburne Hall, March 1969

Sherburne Hall construction, 1968
Sherburne Hall construction, 1968

Sherburne Hall construction, 1968
Sherburne Hall construction, 1968

As the 1960s came to a close, so did the tremendous physical growth of campus. The Baby Boomers were getting older and finishing their studies at universities and colleges all over the country. Sherburne Hall was the last campus student residence to be built at St. Cloud State until Coborn Plaza opened in 2010. With enough space to house 500 students, the building is still the largest campus student residence.

Construction began on Sherburne Hall in the fall of 1967. The $1.8 million structure was financed through bonds issued by the Minnesota State College board to be paid through student rental fees. Designed by Jackson-Hahn Associates, construction contracts were awarded to the Wahl Construction Company (general), Weidner Plumbing and Heating (mechanical), and Granite City Electric (electrical).

According to a press release dated August 25, 1967, Sherburne Hall was scheduled to be 14 stories tall (the tallest building in St. Cloud) and each floor to contain three wings for 14 students projecting from a central core. Each wing would have seven bedrooms, a living-study room, and a bathroom. Sherburne Hall would contain three high-speed elevators, carpeted corridors, living-study rooms, telephones, and a walking tunnel connecting it with other north side residence halls and Garvey Commons. Howard Walton, director of campus planning, said that the building would “incorporate” the best features of Holes, Stearns, and Benton Halls.

At the November 20, 1967, meeting of the Minnesota State College board, the building was named “Sherburne Student Residence”.

Slated to be completed in time for the fall term of 1968, Sherburne Hall did not open until the fall of 1969. The main reason for the delay was a strike by construction workers. A result of Sherburne Hall's opening in the fall of 1969 was Lawrence Hall no longer being used as a residence hall.  The building would be then used for classrooms and faculty offices. 

Along with Stearns and Benton Halls, Sherburne Hall was dedicated on April 11, 1969.

Sherburne Hall was part of the 1987 renovation of Garvey Commons. As part of that renovation, a concourse was built connecting Sherburne Hall with Garvey Commons. The architectural plans for that renovation have been digitized and available for viewing online.

The blueprints for Sherburne Hall, as completed in 1969, are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Shoemaker Hall (1915)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Shoemaker Hall, 1915
Shoemaker Hall (1915)

Waite A. Shoemaker
Waite A. Shoemaker

Shoemaker Hall dining room, 1916
Shoemaker Hall dining room (1916)

Model of Shoemaker Hall with 1960 addition
Model of Shoemaker Hall with 1960 addition

Shoemaker Hall's 1960 addition
Shoemaker Hall's 1960 addition

Opened in the fall of 1915 as a residence hall for women, Shoemaker Hall is the second oldest standing campus building. It is named in honor of Waite A. Shoemaker, who held many roles at St. Cloud State – student, faculty member, and then president. Shoemaker died in March 1916.

Planning for Shoemaker Hall began by at least 1912. At the November 30, 1912, meeting of the Minnesota normal school board, a resolution was passed to ask the Minnesota state legislature for an appropriation of $80,000 to construct a new dormitory for women. That $80,000 appropriation was granted by the legislature on April 28, 1913. The normal school board acted at their November 21, 1913, meeting, appointing a committee to make recommendations for placing the new dormitory. By February 1914, the new dormitory’s location was set – the normal school board asked for bids for the sale and removal of two buildings on the west side of 1st Avenue South. With 60 rooms to accommodate 110 students, Shoemaker Hall was the first St. Cloud State building placed on the west side of that street – or any street in the neighborhood - and had a commanding view of the Mississippi Riverview before Eastman Hall opened in 1930.

Designed by Minnesota state architect Clarence Johnston, the blueprints for the new dormitory were dated August 19, 1914. Construction began sometime that fall of 1914. The building, which featured local yellow brick similar to Riverview, was opened for students in late November 1915.

According to Bill Morgan, professor emeritus at St. Cloud State and architectural historian, Shoemaker Hall is Federal Revival Style. Federal Revival Style are buldings built in the Federal Style after 1820 (Federal Style was popular between 1780 and 1820). Morgan says that "Federal is a refined version of Georgian architecture, mainly showing recessed arches." If a portico (or porch) is present on a building that is Federal Style, it tends to be less bulky than what one may find on a Georgian style building. According to Morgan, the portico (or porch on Shoemaker Hall) seems "heavier" than what one would find on a Federal Style structure in the eastern United States. In addition, the balustrade is a key element of Federal Style, but the one on Shoemaker Hall has been removed. But the windows set in recessed arches and the low-pitched roof still survive.

Though no official action was done by the state normal board, the dormitory has always been known as Shoemaker Hall. During the time the building was being constructed and then opened, Shoemaker was on a leave of absence as president for an illness. In November 1914, Isabel Lawrence was named acting president while Shoemaker was ill. Unfortunately, Shoemaker never returned to St. Cloud State – he passed away in March 1916. The building was dedicated on June 5, 1916. And in that program, the dormitory is referred to as Shoemaker Hall.

According to an article June 5, 1916 edition of the "St. Cloud Times," which discussed that day's dedication of the building, the building was "erected by St. Cloud labor with the use of local material throughout." In addition, the article said that the building was built "absolutely fire-proof, with all the modern conveniences, to make the recollections of the students dwelling therein, the fondest in the history of their education."

Shoemaker Hall was not immune to the physical growth of campus due to the arrival of the Baby Boomers in the late 1950s. In fact, Shoemaker Hall was affected early on as the campus struggled to provide enough housing for students, especially for men. By the fall of 1960, a large addition to Shoemaker Hall to house 400 more students opened, making it the largest campus dormitory at the time.

Designed by Frank Jackson and Associates, construction of the addition began in May 1959. Costing $1.4 million, east (six stories) and west (four stories) wings just south of the existing building were constructed by Wahl Construction Company. The addition also included a two story central section containing a 275 seat dining room which connected the addition to the old part of Shoemaker Hall, which was remodeled and redecorated at the same time.

According to a press release dated August 11, 1960, Shoemaker Hall addition rooms on each floor were to be clustered around bathrooms, a lounge, living room, and utility room. This arrangement allowed “more privacy than is provided by dormitories where rooms face each other across the hall.”

Two students were to occupy each room and provided “with two single beds, a lounge chair, two fiberglass study chairs, a vinyl-topped double study desk, separate closets and a book utility shelf.”

The dormitory’s main recreation room was on the ground floor and “equipped with ping pong and shuffleboard facilities” as well as a 60 seat television room. The addition also included a kitchen and dining room “of the latest design,” which featured “stainless steel equipment, ceramic tile floors and walls, walk-in freezers, modern dishwashers, and a conveyer belt for moving dishes from the dining room to the dishwashing room.”

On November 22, 1960 an open house was conducted that featured a buffet supper, dance, and tours of the building. The dance, held in Shoemaker Hall’s recreation room, featured music by the Moon Misters.

In the summer of 2011, the 1915 portion of Shoemaker Hall was renovated, costing $6 million and brought the oldest part of the building into the 21st century. The renovation included resurfaced hardwood floors, upgraded ventilation, plumbing, and electrical systems, new energy-efficient restrooms, new furnishings, and new closet storage. The renovation also included a technology center, multipurpose rooms, activity lounge, theater-style video room, card-access entry, and surveillance cameras.

While the old portion of Shoemaker Hall was renovated in 2011, the east and west wings were renovated in between 2013 and 2014, opening for occupancy in the fall of 2014. The renovation cost $17.4 million, gutting the entire 1960 addition. This included smaller and more private bathrooms, upgraded Wi-Fi, air conditioning, kitchen and lounge facilities on each floor, two laundry rooms, and a recreational game room.

The blueprints for both the 1915 construction and the 1960 addition are available on the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources

Stearns Hall (1966)

Images

Images available to download from the University Archives' Archon portal:

Holes Hall (1965) and Stearns Hall (1966) under construction, 1966

Holes Hall and Stearns Hall, 1966

Holes Hall and Stearns Hall, 1967

Holes Hall and Stearns Hall, 1967

Stearns Hall, 1970s

St. Cloud State continued to grow as the Baby Boomers came of age and flocked to campuses across the United States to get a college education. After the fall 1965 opening of Holes Hall, the first campus high rise residence hall, plans were underway to construct additional campus housing because of an acute shortage - housing on campus and nearby were at a premium. Nearly identical to Holes Hall, Stearns Hall attempted to alleviate that shortage.

Designed by Jackson-Hahn Associates, construction began in the fall of 1965 on recently acquired state property. With a budget of almost $1.4 million, Wahl Construction Company was the general contractor. Other contractors included Granite City Electric and Sporleder Heating and Plumbing. Construction was financed through the sale of self-liquidating revenue bonds to be repaid from room rental revenue.

Opened in September 1966, the nine story Stearns Residence Hall contained 400 beds for male students. Yet when it opened, the building was still unnamed. At the January 11, 1966, meeting of the Minnesota state college board, St. Cloud State proposed to name the yet-to-be constructed building “Albertina C. Anderson Student Residence” – and the resolution was tabled for unknown reasons. Miss Anderson was an alum of St. Cloud State as well as a faculty member, retiring in 1944 after 39 years of service. On December 16, 1966, the Minnesota state college board approved the name “Stearns Residence Hall.” According to the resolution, the name was selected for three reasons:

  • To honor Charles T. Stearns, a distinguished citizen of Minnesota
  • Because the “main” campus of St. Cloud State is located in Stearns County (which is named for Charles T. Stearns)
  • To honor the first building of St. Cloud State, Stearns House, a former hotel built by Charles T. Stearns, which entirely housed the new school from its establishment in 1869 to the fall of 1874 when Old Main opened.

Despite the opening of Stearns Residence Hall in September 1966, on and off campus housing was in high demand. According to a July 13, 1966 press release, campus housing capacity rose to 2402 beds, yet there were still 700 names on a waiting list. The rise was due to the opening of Stearns Hall as well as converting two-student rooms to three-student rooms in “old” Shoemaker Hall and Lawrence Hall. Campus leaders urged St. Cloud residents to provide more rental rooms for students.

Two more residence halls were constructed after Stearns Hall opened in September 1966 – Benton Hall in 1967 (and its north addition in 1968) and Sherburne Hall in 1969. All three buildings were dedicated on April 11, 1969.

Stearns Hall was last occupied in May 2014.

The blueprints for Stearns Hall as it looked when it opened in 1966 are available in the University Archives’ Archon portal.

Additional Sources