Interfaith Calendar

Interfaith Calendar


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Religious observances allow the university to reflect on and practice the values that we as a campus community openly espouse, including sensitivity and respect for all cultures and religions. We are a community that embraces our diversity and encourages the celebration of multicultural traditions.

This resource includes dates, descriptions and information about some of the many religious holy days celebrated by faculty, staff and students at St. Cloud State. Also included with many are recommended accommodations to assist with planning classroom activities and other academic and co-curricular events.

August - September - October - November - December - January - February - March - April - May - June - July  - List All Holidays

Sukkot (Jewish) – Oct. 4-5

Description: A week-long celebration which begins with the building of Sukkah for sleep and meals; Sukkot is named for the huts Moses and the Israelites lived in as they wandered the desert before reaching the promised land.

General Practices:  Sukkot, beginning at sundown, families in the United States commonly decorate the sukkah with produce and artwork.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events or activities on the first two days.

Future dates:
Sept. 23-24, 2018

Shemini Atzeret (Atzereth) (Jewish) – Oct. 11-12

Description: A fall festival, which includes a memorial service for the dead and features prayers for rain in Israel.

General Practices:  Beginning at sundown, Jews light a Yahrzeit memorial candle at sundown on Shemini Atzereth (the 8th night of Sukkot).

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events or activities on the first two days.

Future dates:
Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 2018

Simchat Torah (Jewish) – Oct. 12-13

Description: Simchat Torah marks the completion of the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah in the synagogue and the beginning of the new cycle.

General Practices:  Practitioners dance in synagogues as all the Torah scrolls are carried around in seven circuits.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events or activities on the first two days.

Future dates:
Oct. 1-2, 2018

Diwali (Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jain) – Oct. 19

Description: Diwali—the Hindu “festival of lights”—is an extremely popular holiday for multiple religions throughout Southern Asia. Diwali extends over five days and celebrates the victory of good over evil.

Fireworks, oil lamps and sweets are common. The lamps are lit to help the goddess Lakshmi find her way into people’s homes.

General Practices:  Lighting oil lamps and candles, setting off fireworks, and prayer.

Recommended Accommodations: Avoid scheduling important academic deadlines, events, and activities on this date. Hindu employees will likely request a vacation day on this date.

Future dates:
Nov. 7, 2018

Samhain (Pagan, Wiccan, Druid) – Oct. 31-Nov. 1

Description: One of the four "greater Sabbats" and considered by some to be the Wiccan New Year. A time to celebrate the lives of those who have passed on, welcome those born during the past year into the community, and reflecting on past relationships, events and other significant changes in life.

General Practices: Paying respect to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets and other loved ones who have died.

Future dates:
Oct. 31-Nov. 1 annually