Course Descriptions: Spring 2007

HONS 170

Intro to Communication Studies J. Lynch
This course focuses on theory and practice related to communication studies in general, and to interpersonal, small group, and public communication in particular. You will read about and discuss important ideas about how communication influences individuals and society, and you will apply those ideas in order to enhance your ability to work well with others and to improve your capacities to think critically, organize clearly, and speak effectively.

Intro to Communication Studies J. Lynch
This course focuses on theory and practice related to communication studies in general, and to interpersonal, small group, and public communication in particular. You will read about and discuss important ideas about how communication influences individuals and society, and you will apply those ideas in order to enhance your ability to work well with others and to improve your capacities to think critically, organize clearly, and speak effectively.

HONS 180

From Enlightenment to Romanticism J. Dorn

HONS 198

Research Paper: From Enlightenment to Romanticism J. Dorn
This course will move from studying how Romanticism emerged out of ideas of the European Enlightenment of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to recognizing how ideas from both Romanticism and the Enlightenment continue to interact in contemporary times. In order to provide students with a starting point, the course will spend at least a month on the topic of “the Wild Man." This unit will review various interpretations of human beings' relation to wildness from both the early modern period and the twentieth century. Kipling’s Jungle Book will give narrative depth and complexity to the discussion. As a case study, the topic of the Wild Man will allow students to discuss ideas about what counts as civilized and as wild, considering Freudian as well as romantic and enlightenment views of human nature. Such a topic will be suggestive enough to allow students to develop research projects that will practice using abstract ideas.

HONS 181

Myth, Legends, and Sacred Literature of the Americas K. Wenz

HONS 196

Myth, Legends, and Sacred Literature of the Americas K. Wenz
HONS 196 can not be taken in addition to HONS 181, above.
HONS 196 can be combined with HONS 410; see just below.

HONS 198

Research Paper: Myth, Legends, and Sacred Literature of the Americas K. Wenz
HONS 198 can not be taken without HONS 181 or 196, above.
Students will explore the concept of the hero and villain figures in myth and legend, including ancient sky and creation myths as well as modern myth, with particular focus on Native American and Mesoamerican mythology. Students will engage in classroom and field trip activities that provide enriching experiences to understand the relationship between the literature and study of mythology, oral traditions of native peoples and the spiritual roots of mythology as well as the scientific aspect of mythological stories, particularly those related to the sky and the natural world. Students will read specific myths related to Mesoamerica, and will study the writings of Joseph Campbell, renowned mythologist. Students will focus on research papers with topics related to myth and legend.

HONS 410

Educational Tour of Maya Ruins M. Nook
Astronomy students may also be going on this trip to the Yucatan. Can be taken by itself or combined with HONS 196, above.
Course involves travel to the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico to tour and study Maya ruins and the Maya people of today. The class will meet three times before the trip and twice following the trip for an hour each time. A journal and final paper will be required. The trip will take place during spring break and we expect to visit sites such as Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Coba, and Tulum. The subject matter is archaeoastronomy, the sky as seen by ancient peoples. It is not a science class. Some Astronomy students may join us on the trip. A fee will be charged as part of the registration costs to cover travel costs. At present the fee has not been set, but it is anticipated to be between $1,500 and $2,000. Watch email for a possible required, advance informational meeting and/or advance fee payment during Fall semester.

HONS 198

Research Paper: Mothering: Images and Realities M. Mikolchak
Through lecture, seminar discussions, readings, films, and reflective assignments, this course will open up conversations allowing us to confront maternal myths, ideals and stereotypes that have been considered the norm in the discourses on motherhood over the last 30-40 years. Our goal will be to resist and deconstruct the socially dominant ideals of motherhood and re-create experience of motherhood. (This course is combined with HUMS 250, the foundational course in SCSU's new interdisciplinary Humanities major and minor.)

Research Paper: A Literature of Their Own: Victorian Literature and Victorian Women J. Zasadny
Although even the mention of the Victorian Era conjures up images of piety and propriety—the beloved Queen reputedly advised her daughter to “Lie back and think of England" on her wedding night—it hardly does justice to the age. While Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the Durbervilles was certainly the doomed, tragic pawn, she is joined by the likes of George Eliot, no one’s milquetoast, and the nonsense verse of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. How do women manage in an age that is ruled by a queen but also very suppressive of her female subjects? Women writers found ways. They also received critical support from influential men like John Stuart Mill. This class will study the marginalized voices of the Victorian Era to see how they managed to be heard during a time in which they weren’t supposed to be saying anything at all.

HONS 243

Mothering: Images and Realities M. Mikolchak

A Literature of Their Own: Victorian Women and Victorian Literature J. Zasadny

HONS 253

Religions, Philosophy, and Conceptions of Gender in India D. Boyer
Besides serving as a general introduction to Hindu philosophy and religion and the origins of Buddhism in India, this course will examine concepts of gender not only in the human world, but at cosmic levels as well: Shakta (female power) and Hindu monism, female deities and the meaning of deity, goddesses as multiple forms of the one goddess, the pairing-up of gods and goddesses, and female and male Boddhisatvas in Buddhism. We won't utterly ignore "real-world" (?) reverberations: we'll look at gender in the caste system, gender norms from classical mythology, men's and women's participation in Goddess worship, and gender in the Buddhist world. This class is combined with the Religious Studies course "Religions of South Asia."

The HONS 253 and 263 gender courses on India are not combined into one class. You can't take both for credit. (It'd be a time conflict, anyway.) However, the two instructors may sometimes combine classes for films, speakers, and field trips, and we'll do guest lectures and assignments in each other's classes.

HONS 263

Women of India: Their Lived Experiences in Hindu Society L. Subrahmanyan
The course, will discuss the lived experiences of Hindu women of India today and in earlier times. We will examine how Hinduism is practiced by women and how their experiences of the culture and religion are mediated by their status and role in a patriarchal society. A variety of women’s experiences will be covered: ancient, modern, urban, rural, rich, poor, educated and professional, working women, etc.

HONS 260

Minnesota Settlements R. Rothaus
The research seminar focuses on thematic issues related to long-term human-environmental interaction in the state of Minnesota during all periods of human occupation. The course is interdisciplinary in nature incorporating aspects of history, archaeology, geography and environmental science. Students must conduct their own research in primary sources. The course themes and material are driven by the Mille Lacs Kathio project, a joint research and educational endeavor of the Archaeological Computing Laboratory, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources--Parks and Recreation, and the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. Students work as a group gaining background knowledge and then working on their own research projects: examples include Diminishing Wild Rice Crops, Prehistoric Ceramics, Mille Lacs Band Treaty History, and Oral Histories of the Depression. There is significant hands-on time: we start with snowshoeing to archaeological sites in the park, and end canoeing the Rum River to discuss landscape history. There will be two required Saturday activities in Mille Lacs Kathio State Park.

HONS 300

Turn of the Century Music C. Verrilli
The end of the nineteenth century was one of the most fascinating and unusually productive periods of time in all major art forms; fin-de-siècle Paris was the cultural center of the Western world—the worlds of le Moulin Rouge, bourgeoisie salon evenings, class distinction, cultural revolution(s), coupled with the relative ease of international travel and curiosity about the East contributed to an interdisciplinary approach to the creative process that rocked the middle and upper classes.

This course will introduce, describe and elaborate upon this incredible confluence of artistic, ethnic, and scientific evolutions. Lectures and guest lectures will describe the cross-pollination of creators of music, poetry, literature, visual art, and philosophies of people converging in Paris from all over France, Spain, Russia, Japan and China. Readings will include poetry and literary excerpts. The instructor's facility in French, Spanish, Italian and German will make a variety of international resources available to the class in English translation. Students will experience guided listening, attend concerts and possibly art exhibits, and see one or more films. Students will learn to identify cultural and gender markers that contributed to the larger products of art, music and literature in Paris around 1900. Writing assignments and exams will develop and test the student's synthesis of this wealth of information.

Minnesota Settlements R. Rothaus
The research seminar focuses on thematic issues related to long-term human-environmental interaction in the state of Minnesota during all periods of human occupation. The course is interdisciplinary in nature incorporating aspects of history, archaeology, geography and environmental science. Students must conduct their own research in primary sources. The course themes and material are driven by the Mille Lacs Kathio project, a joint research and educational endeavor of the Archaeological Computing Laboratory, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources--Parks and Recreation, and the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. Students work as a group gaining background knowledge and then working on their own research projects: examples include Diminishing Wild Rice Crops, Prehistoric Ceramics, Mille Lacs Band Treaty History, and Oral Histories of the Depression. There is significant hands-on time: we start with snowshoeing to archaeological sites in the park, and end canoeing the Rum River to discuss landscape history. There will be two required Saturday activities in Mille Lacs Kathio State Park.

HONS 403

Heterosexism and Homophobia H. Hackman
Institutionalized heterosexism and homophobia and the impact on Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender-Queer people.

HONS 410

Educational Tour of Maya Ruins M. Nook
Students will explore the concept of the hero and villain figures in myth and legend, including ancient sky and creation myths as well as modern myth, with particular focus on Native American and Mesoamerican mythology. Students will engage in classroom and field trip activities that provide enriching experiences to understand the relationship between the literature and study of mythology, oral traditions of native peoples and the spiritual roots of mythology as well as the scientific aspect of mythological stories, particularly those related to the sky and the natural world. Students will read specific myths related to Mesoamerica, and will study the writings of Joseph Campbell, renowned mythologist. Students will focus on research papers with topics related to myth and legend.

ENGL 203 online

An alternative for HONS 243 or 303,
available Summer 2006 (C. Perry), Fall 2006 (S. Engel), and Spring 2007 (S. Engel)

In Summer 2006, HONS 198 will not be available with this course.  Contact Connie Perry for information about the course content.

In Fall 2006 and Spring 2007, please contact Susan Engel (see below) about adding HONS 198. 

The following is a description of the course offered as by Ms. Engel.

Gender Issues in Literature (Diversity/gender)
Explore gender issues in literature through online discussion and essay postings in HONS 243/English 203.  Current reading selections include four novels and one play.  Literary depiction of relationships in Ann Patchett’s novel Bel Canto, female circumcision in Alice Walker’s novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, homosexuality in Paul Monette’s memoir Becoming a Man, multiple gender roles in Michael Cunningham’s novel The Hours, and domestic relationships in the 1800s in Henrik Ibsen’s drama A Doll’s House are examined.  

Reading selections vary slightly each semester.  In Fall 2006, readings may be adapted for a closer fit to the question of modernity raised in the Elizabethan Honors course group.

Honors students must identify themselves to the instructor and must complete an Honors component to fulfill Honors credit through this course.  An Honors link is found within the course content online for English 203.  Fulfillment of the one-credit HONS 198 can also be facilitated through this instructor's class.

To register via SCSU’s online registration, choose ENGL 203, section 54.  Contact Susan Engel at saengel@stcloudstate.edu or at 320.308.3916 with questions.  Note:  A technology fee of $60 (the fee may increase) is added to tuition for English 203 online.

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