Course Descriptions: Spring 2005

HONS 110

Introduction to Baseball Statistics W. Branson
An introduction to statistics, using baseball as our database. This class will focus on two things. First, we'll learn basic statistics, such as correlation and regression, basic probability, and sampling, using baseball statistics. Second, we'll investigate the impact a well-defined statistic can have on the culture of baseball. This class is equivalent to STAT 193 for fulfilling major requirements and course prerequisites.

HONS 130

Human Biology: Health Issues, Personal Choices P. Hauslein
Biology of current health issues with regard to social policy and personal choices. Seminar and lab. Possible topics include mental health, genetics, how we learn, drug use, nutrition, exercise, cancer, HIV. The students enrolled in the course will determine which topics we pursue. This course meets the Honors lab science requirement.

HONS 170

Introduction to Communication Studies T. Spry
This course focuses on theory and practice related to communication studies in general, and to interpersonal, small group, and public communication in particular. You will read about and discuss important ideas about how communication influences individuals and society, and you will apply those ideas in order to enhance your ability to work well with others and to improve your capacities to think critically, organize clearly, and speak effectively.

HONS 180

Shakespeare, An Introduction C. Abartis
Shakespeare is considered one of the cultural treasures of the English-speaking world. Let us explore some of the riches of Shakespeare's works on our way to appreciating and, I hope, enjoying his powerful, complex, multi-layered plays. We will read, discuss, and watch videotapes of one tragedy, one comedy, and one history: "Romeo and Juliet" (1594-96), "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (1594-96), and "Henry IV, Part One" (1597). Students will keep an informal journal of their thoughts on the works we read and will write three or four formal papers. We will practice techniques for achieving clarity and grace in writing: parallelism, conciseness, precise word choice, appropriate punctuation, and variation in sentence length.

HONS 198

Research Paper: Shakespeare, An Introduction C. Abartis
Students will learn how to use the resources of the library to research topics. Students will practice incorporating the research of other scholars into their own writing with the use of brackets, ellipsis dots, quotation marks, notes, and bibliographies.

HONS 180

Literature and Composition, Ethics and Morals J. Foster

HONS 198

Research Paper: Ethics and Morals J. Foster
We will practice college writing while reading and studying The Moral Life: An Introductory Reader in Ethics and Literature by Louis J. Pojman. Literature dramatizes the ethical and moral systems and issues that philosophers study in the abstract. Writing facilitates our ability to reflect on and analyze these systems and issues. Discussion-based class. Five formal papers, rough drafts, peer editing.

HONS 240

Medieval European Literature R. Dillman

HONS 198

Research Paper: Medieval European Literature R. Dillman
This course will involve reading, analyzing, and discussing Medieval European literature. Class activities include presentations, discussion, critical reading and writing, and viewing films about the historical and cultural contexts of the literature. Students will write a research paper on some important aspect of Medieval European studies.

HONS 240

Language and Literature of the Bible J. Hibbard/E. Koffi

HONS 198

Research Paper: Language and Literature of the Bible J. Hibbard

HONS 240

Language and Literature of the Bible E. Koffi/J. Hibbard

HONS 198

Research Paper: Language and Literature of the Bible E. Koffi

HONS 251

Latin American Philosophy S. Nuccetelli
The course is intended to present a substantial body of philosophical work from Latin America. We will ask philosophical questions about topics such as: the treatment of the natives from the Americas by the Iberian conquerors, the philosophical rationale used to argue for the independence of Latin America from Spain and Portugal, the ideas proposed by Latin American philosophers regarding the social and political organization of the newly independent nations, and the problem of Latin American identify and its multiple interpretations. Although the approach to all these will be philosophical, the issues raised would involve Latin American studies, literature, history, art history, political science, and anthropology.

HONS 253

Philosophy and Feminism L. Bergin
This course is an introduction to feminist thought and theory. We will examine differing feminist philosophical perspectives on three general topics, 1) oppression, power, and resistance; 2) women, knowledge, and the body, and 3) the "naturalness" of gender, sex, race, and sexuality. In the context of the topics we will explore such issues as ethnicity and race, gender, sexuality, and class.

HONS 263

Women in U.S. Politics J. Olsen
Using the Spring Semester 2005 Women on Wednesday speaker series as a framework, this course will examine the facts about women in political roles, as well as address the social, cultural, political and power dynamics of women in elected office in the U.S. Included will be analysis of the demographics and faces of women in politics over the last 30 years, how women in elected office are portrayed by the media and perceived by the public, and how the power bases of women in office compare to men in elected office. We will study the actual careers of women in U.S. politics, the gender gap in terms of voting, and the ways that policy outcomes and political issues differently affect women and men.

Men are from Earth and so are Women: An Exploration of Gender Similarities E. Hope
The long standing assumption is that men and women are different, if not complete opposites. This course will serve to debunk this notion by exploring the similarities that exist between the genders. Further, this course will examine the existence of multiple genders. Attention will be given to gender messages, development, and socialization through the lifespan. Current literature from sociology, human ecology, biology, feminist studies, and queer theory will be utilized.

HONS 300

Technology Management: From Idea to Impact B. Kasi
This course will explore synthesis of the history of modern technology and technological culture in terms of Idea, Invention, Innovation, and impact. The secondary focus will be the social history of American Technology. This course will explore emerging technologies that are poised to make a dramatic impact on our society. Various technology assessment and management topics will be covered. Some examples are: Road mapping and Innovation, Disruptive technologies, Gender issues in technology, Emotional design, Fusion Biometrics, Location-aware computing, Nanotech and Energy, Augmentation Robots, Technology adoption life cycle etc.

Creative Thinking Z. Rockenstein
This purpose of this course is to expand the student's ability to think and solve problems creatively. Students will study the best in creativity theory. This theory will be applied to personal projects designed to stretch each student's capacity to think creatively. Assignments include journals, a major personal project, and a final exam on the texts.

HONS 301

Technology and Third World Development A. Akubue
This course is about the role of technology in socioeconomic development in developing countries. It attempts to explain why some countries (Western and Japan) are developed and others are not. It identifies obstacles preventing Third World countries from effectively using available technology to foster socioeconomic development. Content includes identifying the Third World, development strategies used, the transfer of technology, the integration of appropriate technology as a necessary ingredient for Third World development, and how and who technology and the development process affect women and girls the way they do. It is a lecture and discussion class, requiring students to do reviews of articles and identify a Third World country of their choice to research and offer solution to prevailing social, economic, and environmental problems.

Melting Pots and Mosaics: Notions of Race in Real Life J. Laker/Y. Lehman
Many discussions about race and culture seem to portray it as an abstraction to be found somewhere other than in the lives of the people talking. When it is discussed on a personal level, it often generates fear, anger, guilt, or is talked about as a novelty (e.g. food we tried, a speaker we watched, a friend of a certain color, etc.). This course is for people who would like to increase their understanding of race, ethnicity, and culture in a way that is meaningful to real daily life. We will explore the taboos, cultural fetishes, and ideas that shape our relations with each other, and we will illuminate often invisible manifestations of them in order to make sense of their influence on society. We will examine the mundane places through which we pass on any given day (e.g. campus, local schools, businesses, civic groups, churches, etc.) to unpack identity as a mediator of human experience. There will also be a service-learning component woven into the course.

Bearing Witness in Painting and Poetry of the World: The Artist as an Agent for Social Change T. Hauptman
This course will examine the historical/cultural and ritual distinctions within a myriad of aesthetic mileaus. Students will grow in attunement to the mythic image, examining difficult questions: "Where does art come from?" "Who created it?" "What are the spiritual, social implications, functions and symbols, the driving forces behind beauty, expression and artistic resonance?" "What does it mean to the artist, the culture, the community the viewer? How does art contribute to the good of the community? How does art wake people up to vision?" "Human rights/human wrongs."

HONS 303

Women in U.S. Politics J. Olsen
Using the Spring Semester 2005 Women on Wednesday speaker series as a framework, this course will examine the facts about women in political roles, as well as address the social, cultural, political and power dynamics of women in elected office in the U.S. Included will be analysis of the demographics and faces of women in politics over the last 30 years, how women in elected office are portrayed by the media and perceived by the public, and how the power bases of women in office compare to men in elected office. We will study the actual careers of women in U.S. politics, the gender gap in terms of voting, and the ways that policy outcomes and political issues differently affect women and men.

Mothering and Motherhood: Images and Issues M. Mikolchak
Through lecture, seminar discussions, readings, films, and reflective assignments, this course will open up conversations allowing to confront maternal myths, ideals, and stereotypes that have been considered the norm in the discourses on motherhood over the last 30-40 years. Our goal will be to resist and deconstruct the socially dominant ideals of motherhood and re/create experience of motherhood. The course should be a truly interdisciplinary undertaking, and the different humanities fields involved in the course will be sociology, history, literature, film, and feminism.

Men are from Earth and so are Women: An Exploration of Gender Similarities E. Hope
The long standing assumption is that men and women are different, if not complete opposites. This course will serve to debunk this notion by exploring the similarities that exist between the genders. Further, this course will examine the existence of multiple genders. Attention will be given to gender messages, development, and socialization through the lifespan. Current literature from sociology, human ecology, biology, feminist studies, and queer theory will be utilized.

HONS 495

Honors Thesis Completion P. Hauslein
In consultation with faculty expert mentors, each student will finish an individual thesis on an advanced topic in any area. All students will give each other feedback and ideas as you work through stages of thesis development and drafts. The class will present at SCSU's spring student research colloquium. This class, along with its 1-credit predecessor in fall semester, adds up to a 3-credit Honors elective. Students who are not taking HONS 400, Honors Thesis Planning, 1 cr., in fall semester, should see Dr. Hauslein about making up this class by arrangement and getting the thesis process moving along. By Honors director's approval, Diversity (MGM) topics are possible, and by approval of your major advisor this class might be able to count as an elective or capstone in your major. And an abstract of our thesis will look sooo coool to a grad school or employer!

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