Course Descriptions: Fall 2005

HONS 170

Intro to Communication Studies T. Spry
This course focuses on theory and practice related to communication studies in general, and to interpersonal, small group, and public communication in particular. You will read about and discuss important ideas about how communication influences individuals and society, and you will apply those ideas in order to enhance your ability to work well with others and to improve your capacities to think critically, organize clearly, and speak effectively.

HONS 170

Intro to Communication Studies J. Senchea
This course focuses on theory and practice related to communication studies in general, and to interpersonal, small group, and public communication in particular. You will read about and discuss important ideas about how communication influences individuals and society, and you will apply those ideas in order to enhance your ability to work well with others and to improve your capacities to think critically, organize clearly, and speak effectively.

HONS 183

Gender and the Natural World S. Ross

HONS 198

Research Paper: Gender and the Natural World S. Ross
As human beings, we are members of the larger community of the natural world. But we are members not simply as human beings but more specifically as men and women. Through our reading and discussion of a variety of literary texts (fiction, nonfiction, poetry), this course explores the following questions: What forces shape that more particular gendered membership in the community of nature? What are the effects of that shaping on thought and action? What forces construct a gendered concept of nonhuman nature and what are the implications? In what ways do the writers we read extend our understanding of the positions and roles of human beings as men and women in the community of nature? The course explores these questions as they manifest in the following three thematic areas: The development of a coherent self: nature, men and women; Animal familiars: gender and the link to other animals; and The wide world: gender, travel and outdoor adventure.

HONS 240

Reading Shakespeare and Meeting Yourself J. Hibbard

HONS 198

Research Paper: Reading Shakespeare and Meeting Yourself J. Hibbard
The Greeks said the essence of wisdom was to “Know Thyself.” Thoughtful humans have known how hard this is. But one wonderful tool in coming to know more of ourselves is to read great art, especially Shakespeare. When we read a great play like Hamlet, carefully and thoughtfully, and do it in the community of other readers, we can come to see a great deal about how we interpret, judge, evaluate and know in the great questions of being human that the play raises. This helps us see more clearly how we interpret and know in our own lives and make our own sense of being human. In Shakespeare we see a little of ourselves, and in making our meaning in his plays we see something of how we make ourselves. This class will read only Hamlet, first quickly to be familiar with language, plot and characters, and then read again and again more slowly and deeply looking into the exciting and disturbing questions Shakespeare raises. Students will keep regular readers’ journals and write two class papers of five and ten pages.

HONS 240

Myth, Legend and Sacred Literature K. Wenz

HONS 198

Research Paper: Myth, Legend and Sacred Literature K. Wenz
Students will examine Greek and Roman mythology, sky and creation myths from many different cultures around the world, and the legends of King Arthur. The concept of myth as a means of providing meaning and order to different cultures will be studied, as well as the importance and influence of ancient myth and legend as they relate to modern culture.

HONS 250

Philosophy of India D. Boyer

HONS 263

Women of India L. Subrahmanyan
Please note 250 and 263 are paired courses. Must be taken same semester.

These two team-taught courses must be taken as a 6-credit pair. We'll look at classical Hindu philosophy, Hindu world views, and ancient writings on those worldviews. We'll fast-forward to their relevance today. Through an examination of ancient literature and readings on contemporary India, we will examine how women live and how the ideas of male and female are portrayed. We will also study an important Hindu epic: the story of the hero Rama and the rescue of his wife Sita from the demon Ravanna. We won't just stick to mainstream Hindu views that get the most attention in the West, but also read about regional variations in how the old epic is told and their significance to the ways people make sense of the world through a complex system of symbols.

HONS 260

Eastern Europe: Culture and Ideologies P. Miltenoff
A comparative overview of less-known, yet increasingly important region for American politics and economy. Learn basic geographic and historical trends from a less-known region of the world. Learn how to seek and find on the Internet reliable information on topics outside of the U.S. Learn basic philosophical theories in humanities and their application. Learn how to create an electronic portfolio and reflect the gained knowledge in electronic format, available via the Internet.

HONS 300

The Horror Film Reconsidered B. Chisholm
This in-depth exploration of the horror film genre will give Honors students the opportunity to help shape a future large-lecture introductory course on this subject that will be offered in 2006. We'll trace the evolution of the genre, examine its many variations, and spend considerable time discussing the way horror deals with issues of redemption, forgiveness, painful hidden truths, our need to believe in and/or contain the irrational, and much more. We'll ask "What are the attractions of horror?" and "How are horror films reflective of the society that produces them?" We'll read and critique an array of essays on horror, and we'll watch and analyze numerous films (some of which will be chosen by the students in the course).

HONS 300

Eastern Europe: Culture and Ideologies P. Miltenoff
A comparative overview of less-known, yet increasingly important region for American politics and economy. Learn basic geographic and historical trends from a less-known region of the world. Learn how to seek and find on the Internet reliable information on topics outside of the U.S. Learn basic philosophical theories in humanities and their application. Learn how to create an electronic portfolio and reflect the gained knowledge in electronic format, available via the Internet.

HONS 303

Gender and Technology B. Kasi
Current research shows that there is a widening gender gap in technology and women are lagging behind men when it comes to advancing in the fields of technology and science. Gender is an element in any techno-social system. How can we encourage students, both men and women, to be designers and controllers of technology? The need to understand and to transform the social role of technology is increasingly urgent in the world where the stereotypes of 'Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus' still exist from Harvard to SCSU! This course will bridge gender theories, technology, and community service in a hands-on environment. This approach will not only have direct impact for the students involved, but also will contribute to the community via active participation. The course will draw from many sources that will include screening films, video discs, multimedia presentations, and on-line sites. This course through seminars, visiting experts from a variety of related fields, and class projects will challenge your assumptions about gender and technology. Students will be challenged with hands-on projects to understand the impact of gender and technology in the community in a final, collaborative effort between the participants in the course and girls and boys in the community. The students will leave the course with a better understanding of how to create frameworks that will include both women and men in a technological society

HONS 400

Honors Thesis Planning P. Hauslein
Would you like to take an Honors elective in which you determine the content to suit your interests? You can shape it to count as a diversity and/or gender elective. It's a sequence of two courses that add up to a 3-credit elective. Take HONS 400, Thesis Planning (2 cr.), in the fall and HONS 495, Thesis Completion (1 cr.), in the spring. You'll develop an ambitious project over the course of a year. An abstract of your thesis will look great to a grad school or employer. Will you be writing a thesis in your major next year? If your major advisor approves you to use HONS 400 plus 495 in place of your major's capstone writing course, you can also double count them as one Honors elective. You will benefit from the experience of explaining your advanced, specialized topic to other students who are good listeners but know nothing about your area of research.

During the fall we will meet twice a week as a writer's group to keep everyone's research projects moving through stages of development and bounce your ideas off other students' brains. We'll help each other with focus and resources. You will need to find a faculty expert mentor in your thesis subject. In spring you'll finish your individual project, present it in our in-class seminar, and show it off at SCSU's Undergraduate Research Colloquium. Questions? Please call Honors Director David Boyer at 8-4945 or e-mail me, plhauslein@stcloudstate.edu.

HONS 403

Psychology of Gifted Women Z. Rockenstein
While gifted women make up 50% of individuals with high intellectual potential and ability, they are seriously underrepresented in positions of power and authority. Research on gifted women indicates that they face both internal and external barriers to the fulfillment of their potential. The ambitious dual purpose of this course is: 1) to examine barriers to achievement in women and 2) to overcome them. Students will explore the lives of gifted women from both historical and psychological perspectives. Students will examine the results of longitudinal studies of gifted women to identify characteristics that apply to their own lives. A Life Dream Project will help you to both analyze your goals and to assess your progress toward achieving them. If you have ever denied that you were gifted, thinking of yourself as merely an “overachiever”, this course is definitely for you!
Alternative for HONS 243, available summer 2005, fall 2005 and spring 2006

ENGL 203 Online

Gender Issues in Literature
Explore gender issues in literature through online discussion and essay postings in HONS 243/English 203. Current reading selections include four novels and one play. Literary depiction of relationships in Ann Patchett’s novel Bel Canto, female circumcision in Alice Walker’s novel Possessing the Secret of Joy, homosexuality in Paul Monette’s memoir Becoming a Man, multiple gender roles in Michael Cunningham’s novel The Hours, and domestic relationships in the 1800s in Henrik Ibsen’s drama A Doll’s House are examined. Reading selections vary slightly each semester.

Honors students must identify themselves to the instructor and must complete an Honors component to fulfill Honors credit through this course. An Honors link is found within the course content online for English 203. Fulfillment of the one-credit HONS 198 can also be facilitated through this instructor's class.

To register via SCSU’s online registration, choose ENGL 203, section 54. Contact Susan Engel at saengel@stcloudstate.edu or at 320.308.3916 with questions. Note: A technology fee of $40 (the fee may increase) is added to tuition for English 203 online.

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