2003 English Department External Review Self-Study

Department of English: Appropriateness and Contribution of the Program

1. Fulfillment of University mission

The department's mission statement and goals, cited on pages 5 and 6, operationalize the university's mission and vision statements:

St. Cloud State University Mission Statement
SCSU is committed to excellence in teaching, learning, and service, fostering scholarship and enhancing collaborative relationships in a global community.

St. Cloud State University Vision Statement
SCSU will be a leader in scholarship and education for excellence and opportunity in a global community.

In particular, the English Department enacts significantly the university mission to prepare students for careers in a fluid global economy reliant upon information, communication, and symbolic analysis and manipulation. Indeed, the English major is ideally suited to prepare people for this kind of environment. Students deal with problematical, diverse, thought-compelling, and ambiguous texts and examine hundreds of characters in hundreds of different kinds of situations. They also write and speak in response to these characters and situations in ways that demand ingenuity, creativity, fluency, and decorum. Our students are constantly confronted with new situations demanding new learning as well as a sense of appreciation for continuity. In short, it is hard to imagine a better simulation and practice for the kind of culture in which we as a nation are immersed.

One senior described how well the Department achieved its B.A. assessment goal of bringing students to "respond to the unfamiliar" with the comment, "You come here from high school not knowing anything, and the courses expose you to so much completely new material, so you find you can now formulate your own opinions." Another commented, "This issue is very important to critical thinking. If you are offended by something, that should be the start of your recognizing what your own opinions are. Moreover, you should take that on as a challenge to then construct your own strategy for arguing against what you are reading" (B.A. Assessment, ENGL 490 Student Comments).

Fulfilment of SCSU Goals

The above comments indicate success in instilling a sensitivity and respect for the values of a diverse society and multicultural world. Faculty help develop a concern for individual worth and human rights by valuing the contributions of students in small-class discussion, and by creating willingness--such as through diverse readings, and through open discussion--to entertain various points of view and to disallow ill-founded methods of critical argumentation.

The English Department fosters effective teaching and learning, demonstrating its strengthening of standards by means of assessment built into the programs. Major programs prepare students for leadership and responsible careers by guiding their ability to voice a self-understanding, whether in creative or expository writing, as well as in classroom interpretation, and to understand their relation to any context.

Writing assignments that engage students create active learning and opportunities for application of knowledge, as well as honing communication skills . As the point of entry for international students into St. Cloud , via the ESL program, many of whose students also elect to take English for teaching, the department brings about classroom interaction among students with increasingly diverse backgrounds, while continuing to serve non-traditional students by offering night courses.

Critical thinking and problem-solving - Assessment of English Composition has reaffirmed the department's mission of teaching argument to students on the first-year level. Research into the nature of instruction in English classrooms has shown that the process of testing validity of argument through the diversity of models and patterns offered from course to course compels a high order of accomplishment of precisely these skills (Donald 262).

The habits of mind developed through a extended program of reading and interpreting lead to life-long learning whether further coursework takes place or not.

College of Fine Arts and Humanities Mission Statement
The College of Fine Arts and Humanities educates the global citizen of the next millennium in communication, visual and performing arts, education and business. .

The departments in the College share a respect for communicative and expressive abilities, diversity and ambiguity, creativity, critical thinking and abstract reasoning, performance and production of meaning, and expertise in the creation and manipulation of symbols. The disciplines in the Fine Arts and Humanities

  • have been at the core of university education since universities were first imagined
  • are in a unique position to remember and preserve the intellectual traditions as well as to design and drive new literacies, new knowledge, new arts, and new humanities
  • actively participate in the construction of the cultural life of the institution and the community
  • are for many people the point of contact between the university and the public
  • educate the people who will be teaching fine arts and humanities, whether as a large, general topic or in one of its many specializations
  • encourage practical application of the principles of our disciplines with internships or education-abroad in England, Germany, France, Costa Rica, and Japan

Our students are our greatest commonality. Their talents and education will lead them to be successful "knowledge workers" of the future, people able to create and manipulate symbols, identify and solve problems, and broker strategies of expression and communication -- in a wide variety of media.

The English Department meets comprehensively the priorities of teaching communicative and expressive abilities, diversity and ambiguity, creativity, critical thinking and abstract reasoning, performance and production of meaning, and expertise in the creation and manipulation of symbols.

The following quotation from a senior Program Reflections assignment serves as an indicator that instruction in critical thinking, communication theory, ambiguity, and the production of meaning is taking place:

"The single largest thing I do now as a direct result of my major and my emphasis is that I analyze every text, every piece of writing, and every word. The subtle insinuations, connotations, values and judgments are constantly brought to the forefront for me. I find biases and passionately held beliefs in even the most mundane texts, ungrounded opinions pop with great regularity, and cultural norms are so commonly used as facts within the words of everyday speech."

Another senior articulates perceived integration of meaning and connects that to artistic performance, as well as observing the Department's contribution to life-long learning:

"All of my English courses feed my artistic and scholarly interests. I do not see the English courses I have gone through as separate, disjointed knowledge. When a semester is over, I do not "flush" the knowledge from my mind, as some students do, as soon as the last test is handed in. In fact, much of the learning I do "in" classes takes place long after those classes have ended, as I apply them to my current learning. Sometimes I simply won't be able to put into manageable form an idea from a class until a subsequent class gives me some perspective on it." (Program Reflections)

Another senior Program Reflection described the training in diversity succinctly: "I think English studies (at its best) makes people more accepting because it constantly positions us in someone else's perspective."

Preservation of intellectual traditions:
The English Department offers courses that aim to bring students to understand the confluence of literary traditions coming together to form American culture in the present and to respond actively with their own writing and interpreting to the cultural context in which they find themselves. Prominent in the program are both courses covering the wide scope of literary heritage, including works through which students encounter points of view utterly different from their own, and courses in writing and creative writing that motivate students to make something of the world for themselves.

Education of future teachers:
The Department continues to educate and train an enormous number of teachers to take jobs in classrooms of all varieties. See the self-study Part 3, Bachelor of Science report.

Support for education-abroad programs:
Several English faculty (Ross, Foster, Gordon) have participated directly as faculty in the Education Abroad program at the Duke of Northumberland's castle in Alnwick, England .

Critical thinking:
See B.A. Assessment report, ENGL 300 Student Learning Indicators, study of genre and critical thinking; see samples of critical thinking assignments attached to the Department syllabi collection.

2. Enrollment management

If one defines enrollment management as recruitment, retention, and successful graduation of cohorts of students, then it would be accurate to say the department's enrollment management efforts have been primarily on the third item in this series. Indeed, as various parts of this document detail, a good deal of our staffing, planning, and scheduling has for many years been informed by our effort to sustain strong undergraduate major and graduate classes and programs while meeting the demand for service to the rest of the university via general education and other service courses.

Over the years, general education courses have accounted for a little less than 2/3 of the percentage of seats offered and credit generated by the English Department, as the following table shows.

English Department Credits Generated 1992-2001

*Numbers before 1998 are quarter-hour credits
**Total undergraduate credits (quarter hours). Before 1996, distinction between lower- and upper-division credits not available;

Academic
Year

Total
Credits

Lower
Division

Upper
Division

Graduate Credits

Gened
Credits

Gened Percentage

2001-2002

18977

12552

5309

1136

10924

58%

2000-2001

21229

14840

5419

970

13584

64%

1999-2000

22077

16936

4282

859

14456

65%

1998-1999

18975

14174

3944

857

12778

67%

*1997-1998

30109

24025

4754

1330

20196

67%

*1996-1997

30499

25066

4216

1217

NA

NA

*1995-1996

30569

**29122

NA

1447

NA

NA

*1994-1995

31121

**29651

NA

1470

NA

NA

*1993-1994

32375

**30976

NA

1389

NA

NA

*1992-1993

32787

**31631

NA

1156

NA

NA

The disproportionate general education load carried by the English department in comparison to the rest of the university is shown by comparing the table above with the following table, which shows the distribution of credits generated across the campus as a whole.

SCSU Total Credits Generated 1992-2001

*Numbers before 1998 are quarter-credit hours

Academic
Year

Total
Credits

Lower
Division

Upper
Division

Graduate Credits

Gened
Credits

Gened Percentage

2001-2002

357547

212347

130724

14476

148786

42%

2000-2001

339575

207895

117942

13738

149760

44%

1999-2000

327029

204473

108646

13910

138170

42%

1998-1999

306133

191358

101798

12977

130783

43%

*1997-1998

490087

301261

166048

22778

182793

37%

*1996-1997

30499

25066

4216

1217

NA

NA

*1995-1996

30569

**29122

NA

1447

NA

NA

*1994-1995

31121

**29651

NA

1470

NA

NA

*1993-1994

32375

**30976

NA

1389

NA

NA

*1992-1993

32787

**31631

NA

1156

NA

NA

Recruitment. The department rarely recruits students in the way that recruitment is now typically thought of. We do not send a department representative into high schools as part of the SCSU recruitment effort, for example. We do, of course, participate in on-campus recruitment events, sending department representatives and also making the chair and other department colleagues available for on-campus visits with student and their parents. Our recruitment is primarily one-to-one contact between faculty and promising students in our 100- and 200-level general education courses and, occasionally, students in our 300-level courses. ENGL 300, which is the official gateway course to the major, enrolls primarily students who have already made at least a tentative commitment to the major. One fruitful recruiting ground has been the Honors courses taught by English faculty. The English department is a major contributor to the SCSU Honors program. In any given semester, there are typically at least four Honors courses taught by English faculty. Most of these are Honors versions of first-year composition. The intellectual excitement of these courses tends to draw these strong students into additional courses in the department.

Recruitment of graduate students is discussed elsewhere, particularly under the discussion of the graduate program and also under the section titled "Costs and Fiscal Management." It is worthy of note here, though, that, with the exception of MATESL students, it has been increasingly difficult to recruit graduate students despite our excellent graduate program. Noncompetitive TA stipends have been a significant part of this difficulty, though the stipends are improving. Reduced numbers of graduate students in our program not only impacts the graduate program itself, but it exacerbates the staffing problems and enrollment management problems in the general education courses as well.

Retention. The relatively small size of our major courses helps engender the intellectual and personal satisfaction that accrues to students in courses that are small enough to enable students and faculty to engage one another frequently in thoughtful conversation and sharing of texts. In recent years, the department has felt the campus-wide (and indeed system-wide) belt tightening that has accompanied steadily increased underfunding, as the following table shows. So far, we have been able to insulate our major courses from this pressure, though we have raised enrollment ceilings by one seat across the board. We have made a conscious decision to preserve enrollment ceilings in major courses at the cost of raising the ceilings in selected general education classes, particularly ENGL 184, introduction to literature, and the popular ENGL 216, American Indian literature, both of which are now being offered in some sections as large lecture classes.

This shift to larger classes, both in the department and campus-wide, is reflected in the overall class size statistics shown in the table immediately below. The statistic for classes larger than 50 for the department does not appear. Our first classes larger than 50 were offered in the fall of 2001, and they are part of the campus-wide jump from 4% to 6% of classes of 50 or more.

Average class size, English and SCSU

Academic
Year

Class Size English

Class Size SCSU

Percent w/ 50 or more SCSU

2002-2003

24.14

2001-2002

24.16

23

6%

2000-2001

22.61

23

4%

1999-2000

22.05

20

4%

1998-1999

20

18

3%

The following table is similar to the first table in this discussion of enrollment management, showing the relative proportion of our curriculum that is occupied be general education and major or graduate courses. The following table presents the distribution in terms of seats filled, rather than credits generated. The numbers in this table and in the table following are for the fall and spring semesters only and do not include summer school enrollments.

English Department Seats Filled: Gened, Major & Grad, and Total

Year

Gened Seats

Major & Grad Seats

Total Seats

2002-03 (fall 2002)

2036

1144

3180

2001-02

3247

2539

5786

2000-01

3599

2300

5899

1999-00

3286

2443

5729

1998-99

3335

1686

5021

With the semester conversion in 1998, the central administration became acutely concerned about a backlog of students needing ENGL 191, the first-year composition course, and SCSU made a public pledge to provide a seat in 191 for every first-year student. In order to achieve this, the department was called upon to increase staffing through the hiring of fixed-term instructors. FTE instructional faculty in the department spiked from 30.55 in 1997-98 to 40.03 in 1998-99, with a headcount of 51. This dramatic increase in staffing corresponds with the high production of enrollments in ENGL 191 during the years 1998-2001, shown in the table below. This level of fixed-term staffing was not sustainable, both because of financial constraints and because of contractual constraints in the collective bargaining agreement. However, the demand for seats remains. The shift toward providing those seats through general education literature courses can be seen in the numbers for the academic year 2001-02 in the table, and it can be seen even more dramatically in the enrollment numbers for both 184, the introduction to literature, and the enrollment numbers for the other general education literature courses in the 201-216 series. At the same time, with improved numbers of graduate teaching assistants in the current year, the capacity in 191 has partially recovered.

General Education Seats By Category: Comp., Intro to Lit., Gened Lits

Year

ENGL 191
FYComp

ENGL 184
Intro Lit

ENGL 201-216
Gened Lits

Total Gened

2002-03 (fall)

1352

303

381

2036

2001-02

2185

534

527

3247

2000-01

2760

503

336

3599

1999-00

2611

545

272

3286

1998-99

2776

264

305

3335

The declining financial support for SCSU and for the MnSCU system in general in recent years has occurred during a period of record budget surpluses for Minnesota . Suddenly, now, the state is faced with record budget deficits, and state funding for next year and the following year will decrease by a total in excess of $21 million from current funding. At the same time, enrollment pressures are significantly increased. For the first time in memory, new admissions were closed off late last summer as courses and classrooms hit their capacity. The applications for fall 2003 are running at a record pace, already substantially above last year's rate. Hence, for the foreseeable future, there will be increasing pressure on the department to become still more efficient in its credit production. For example, we have been asked to consider the possibility of raising the enrollment cap in 191 from 25 to 28. We are now exploring ways to preserve the 25-seat enrollment cap in 191, preserve our current enrollment caps in our major courses, and still achieve yet greater efficiency in credit-hour production.

Throughout the past decade, our major enrollments have remained consistent with the overall enrollment at SCSU, with one aberration caused by the shift from quarters to semesters. As was true of students across campus generally, many our students who were within striking distance of graduation before the semester conversion opted to concentrate their coursework and graduate before the conversion. Hence, our enrollment of majors fell significantly immediately after semester conversion, as the following table shows.

Undergraduate English Majors: Admitted and Intended

Year

Admitted to the English Major

Declared Intention to Major in English

2001-02

206

137

2000-01

194

146

1999-00

171

133

1998-99

124

154

1997-98

164

114

1996-97

175

127

1995-96

188

141

As is reported elsewhere in this document, our students responding to assessment prompts in ENGL 490 report a high level of satisfaction with their English courses. They appreciate the intellectual challenge and the relevance of the coursework to their lives and careers. The range of programs represented by the B.S. and by the several different emphases in the B.A. demonstrates the ubiquitous relevance of English language studies as a source of agency in the world. In addition, the department provides important extracurricular and co-curricular opportunities for nurturing and expanding this sense of agency in a community of like-minded learners. In particular, the Write Place and the student literary magazine, The Harvest , have been sites of important student learning and professionalization . Unfortunately, the student organization for English majors, Lunatics, Lovers, and Poets, has gone defunct despite the efforts of its faculty advisor, Dr. Jack Hibbard. It is to be hoped that LLP or some similar successor organization will re-emerge, as it appears Kaleidoscope , a multicultural student publication sponsored by the Write Place, is about to do.

Successful Graduation . A primary challenge at SCSU institutionally is providing sufficient seats in required courses or guided elective courses to enable its majors to graduate in a timely way. Certainly the English department shares in this institutional challenge, especially given the institutional demand for our service and general education courses. This challenge is further heightened by the fact that our students are not an affluent population. Most work at least part time, and work schedules sometimes interfere with class schedules. For about a decade now, the department has systematically planned and scheduled a portion of major classes in the evening hours, with the purpose of enabling a student to complete the English major exclusively through night classes if necessary. These classes are attractive not only to "nontraditional" older students but to many of our traditional-age cohort of undergraduates as well. Like major enrollments, graduation rates in the major have held essentially steady, with the exception of a spike in baccalaureate graduates preceding the semester conversion, as the following table shows.

Graduations of English Majors: Undergraduate, Graduate, and Total

Year

Baccalaureate Graduates

Master's Graduates

Total Graduates

2001-02

49

15

64

2000-01

59

12

71

1999-00

54

16

70

1998-99

56

14

70

1997-98

66

15

81

1996-97

79

16

95

1995-96

80

20

100

Since undergraduate students commonly may take 5 or 6 years to finish their degrees, and since the English Department's officially enrolled population stands at around 200, these retention rates compare favorably to the campus-wide SCSU retention rate of 43 percent.

3. Contribution to Students

The following data demonstrates that, via its students, the English Department actively participates in the construction of the cultural life of the institution and the community and becomes for many people the point of contact between the university and the public in fulfillment of the College mission. These activities also cultivate students' practices of service, in support of the University's mission.

Student contributions/contributions to students
The contributions to campus life made by English department students themselves are notable, and serve as indicators of the ideal role of the Major in activating student creative energies. English majors can be found anchoring and disk-jockeying at the campus radio station KVSC 88.1 FM, performing in campus dramatics, writing for the student newspaper, the University Chronicle, including writing columns of their own, writing for some of the countless newsletters circulated on campus, or carrying out many other forms of engagement and activism.

The effect of the program on one Applied Writing major is telling: "A few years ago I was the person who went straight to the comics and hit the main headlines and left it at that. Now, I find myself perusing most sections of the paper." (Program Reflections)

Senior portfolios included evidence that advanced writing courses (330s) frequently engage students in research projects that connect them directly to the process of problem-solving, or planning problem-solving, on the SCSU campus and in the community. Examples: proposing a solution to the problem of lack of seating in the new library's lobby "waiting area"; writing a trouble-shooting report to administration to explain how to remove obstructions that prevent low-income students from meeting responsibilities.

The Write Place, led by the director, also sponsored readings of writers from marginalized peoples, a program that drew participation and attendance from across the community and by many students.

The English Department is bringing in a keynote speaker from Rensselaer Polytechnic to present a lecture on "The Film The Fugitive, the Fugitive Slave, and Rodney King" to involve students in the launching of the new Humanities program, March 2003.

Activities such as these provide diversity education as well as education in interdisciplinary methods and new literacies to complement the Department's longstanding, well-enrolled courses in African-American, American Indian, and world literatures.

Ad hoc student organizations - report from the advisor: "Lunatics, Lovers, and Poets" died and is gone. I was also advisor for "Semi-Nude Philosophers," a group that grew up out of one my Honors classes where kids started staying up and having those late-night talks in their dorm underwear and so formalized it into a group-hence the "semi-Nude." Most of those folks are just getting ready to graduate now, but some students from last semester's Milton class are trying to rev things up again. [Student Name] was part of the group, and he posed for a great photo for their website standing there looking thoughtful holding only a briefcase in front of him. I still have that picture somewhere in my files-I'm going to send it to his kids when they turn 16.)

Professionalization of students
The Department fulfills the University's Mission Statement by fostering scholarship, not only among faculty (see Program Quality) but among students:

Undergraduate students have requested that a course be offered in professionalizing them for careers in writing; the Creative Writing Director is now creating that course.

Students additionally gain editorial experience by producing two literary magazines, Upper Mississippi Harvest and a publication emphasizing diversity, Kaleidoscope . Majors also regularly present senior projects, with the sponsorship of faculty, at the Student Research Colloquium held each April.

Graduate students regularly present at conferences, often in collaboration with faculty mentors.

6 current and former Write Place grad students presented at the 2002 Midwest Writing Centers Association conference. Four more will present at the MCTE Conference, Spring 2003.

Between 1997 and 2000, 12 tutors presented conference papers at various Midwest Writing Centers Association Conferences; in addition, two presented at the 1999 National Writing Centers Association convention.

A current M.A. student (Lisa Gjerde) was accepted to the "Shakespeare and Performance" Weekend Workshop directed by Robert Weimann and W.B. Worthen at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC, Spring 2003

Recognition
Evidence of the appropriateness of the program comes from the achievements of a number of our students. This evidence is anecdotal; the department has not collected information about the achievements of our students in any centralized, systematic way. The department does send surveys to alumni/ ae every five years; 2003 would be the next scheduled.

* M.A Thesis, Amy Troolin, one of three finalists for best thesis in the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools thesis competition

* John Saunders' MA thesis was selected for the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools Distinguished Thesis award for SCSU in Fall, 2002

Careers
Kristina DeVoe has earned her master's degree at the Ohio State University , Carrie Schroeder at the University of California - Riverside .

Cindy Johanek has completed her doctorate at Ball State and taken a tenure track position at Denison University . Her dissertation , Composing Research: A Contextualist Paradigm for Rhetoric and Composition has been published (Utah State UP, 2000).

Yue Liu has finished her doctorate at Ball State University, has taught fixed term at Gustavus Adolphus for two years, and has just taken a tenure-track position in composition and Linguistics at Harry Truman College (community college) in Chicago .

Jessica ( Lourey ) Harvey has earned tenure as a teacher at Alexandria Technical College .

Numerous master's degree students have taught and continue to teach at St. Cloud Technical College and at community and technical colleges or the occasional business college throughout the region and metropolitan area, including Anderson, Bonde -Griggs, Burke, Caldwell, Hollerman , Kasimor, Finneman, Oetting, Sjoberg, Wolek, or even temporarily at the University of Minnesota (Krause). Many of these posts have likelihood of becoming permanent teaching positions.

The SCSU English Department above all has benefited from the countless Master's degree students who have continued to teach and provide leadership in the ESL, IEC, and composition programs very effectively SCSU (Ament, Bang, J. Condon, Grether Mohrbacher at present).

Master's degree graduates who teach at community colleges out of state include Snodgrass ( Maryland ), Stephenson ( Parkside, Wisconsin ), Xiao ( Broward, Florida ), Yue Liu ( Chicago ).

Students have entered Ph.D. programs at University of Minnesota (Gardner, Kirchoff ), Iowa State ( Mohrbacher, ABD), Kansas ( Brister, Wicktor ), Northern Arizona University ( Jiang ), Ball State ( Wilken, Xiao), Illinois State-Bloomington (Ludwig), Purdue (Krause, ABD); another (Perry- Moroz ) is now completing an Ed.D at Hamline .

The MFA is another terminal degree sought by graduates (Ament). At least one master's student has entered law school (Hall, UWMadison ), and another is enrolling at United Theological Seminary for an M.Div . (Anderson).

The master's degree is also sought by in-service high school teachers ( Curto, Gusaas, Kaye, Kennedy, Kulm, Meyer); some assist the Department in composition teaching by reflecting their SCSU experience in teaching senior-to-sophomore programs.

A master's degree graduate (Anderson) wrote and directed a one-act play at the Bedlam Theater in Minneapolis in 2002; another (Kaye) is assistant editor of Yad Vashem (Israel) publication.

Student Organizations
English faculty have served as advisors for the following: Organization for the Prevention of AIDS in Africa; Chinese Students' Association; Scandinavian Friendship Club; Alpha Eta Rho Aviation Fraternity; Games Club; Campus Green Party; AER (Aviation majors); Arashi Taiko Dan (Japanese Drumming Club) and Kyokushin Karate.

Internships
For about two decades now, the department, with the support of our deans, has been committed to making a meaningful internship experience available to our students. In our 1992 self-study report, we commented on the evidence accumulating nationally, both from systematic research and from the testimony of students, faculty, and intern supervisors, documenting the value of experiential learning in all majors, particularly in the liberal arts. Certainly the testimony of our own interns has been congruent with these national data. As early as 1988, in response to a questionnaire, alumni of the English department were identifying the internship experience as one of the most valuable aspects of their experience as SCSU. Similar comments have continued to appear, unsolicited, in virtually all the summative reflections that department interns write.

Undergraduate internships typically range from 4 credits up to 16 credits. Up to 8 credits count toward the major, and any credits beyond 8 count as general university electives. Students may do internships during any term. Summer internships are attractive for those who can find a paying internship or who can forego wages from a job or who can balance a part-time internship and part-time job. Normally, we expect interns to spend at least 10 hours a week at the internship site in order to get a well grounded sense of the culture and work flow of the host organization. Hence, the normal 4-credit minimum rather than a lower credit.

We encourage our students to be proactive in discovering prospective host organizations and in creating and negotiating internship oportunities . Occasionally a student will propose an internship or a site that the internship director judges not to be appropriate for an English internship, but we support students' thinking expansively about internship possibilities, and we encourage any substantial, language-rich, text-rich learning experience. The following is a partial list of typical sites:

  • Aria Communications
  • Bankers Systems
  • Catholic Charities
  • Creative Memories
  • Hazen Foundation
  • Meyer Public Relations
  • Minnesota Arthritis Foundation
  • Minnesota Heart Association
  • Minnesota Film Board
  • Northstar Press
  • Pheasants Forever (National Office; publicity, educational materials)
  • St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce
  • St. Cloud Hospital
  • St. Cloud Symphony
  • St. Cloud Times

SCSU:
Alumni Office; College of Science & Engineering (Newsletter editor, tech reports editor); Office of Sponsored Programs; Publications and Public Communication; Literary Arts, University Programming board; St. Cloud United Way; Sartell Sentinel; Vertran; Wheels, Wings, and Water

Despite its value, the internship is not an opportunity that tends to occur to our majors without prompting. Hence, at times when we have vigorously made the program and its benefits visible to our students, participation has been quite good--about 15 per year participating in internships. When we have promoted the program less aggressively, participation tends to fall to three or four students a year, which is where it is now. The program needs a good Web site that links to the departmental Web site and that has links to sources of information about internships generally, and it needs visibility in the hallways around the department. In addition, the faculty, particularly the director, probably need to be more intentional in bringing the program repeatedly to the attention of our students.

Advising
Everyone in the English Department has some advising responsibility, unless temporarily excused because of special circumstances.

The creation of the new Advising Center, under the directorship of an English faculty member, has improved advising of students campuswide enormously, and moved general education advising effectively out of the departments so that they can focus on their majors.

Faculty advisors for each subfield provide both program and career advising. The alphabet is divided up in assigning student names to faculty to even out student contact. Faculty are categorized as Major/Minor Advisors, as advisors in Create Writing, Composition, ESL, English Education, Internship, and as advisors for Transfer students.

4. Contribution to the University and Community

The English Department contributes significantly to the university community, and its influence can be perhaps described as pervasive

Faculty contributions to the University (Responses take into account the past 5 years only)

Positions held
Associate Dean, Fine Arts and Humanities (Cogdill, since 1995)
Special Assistant to the President (Veeder, 2001-02)
Associate Vice-President, Academic Affairs (Inkster, 1999-2001; Veeder 2002-present)
American Indian Center Director (Veeder, 1999-2001)
Faculty Director of Advising, ¾ time (Klepetar, since 1997)
This newly created office and position largely oversaw the Semester Conversion process; the director wrote the advising plan for SCSU. The advising center has grown from 1.33 to 8.33 faculty and staff advisors. This includes seven full-time professional advisors, four .25 faculty advisors, and the director (.75 in advising).
Chair, Department of Art (Sebberson, 2002-05)
SCSU Faculty Association President (Foster, 2000-01)
Institutional and General Education Assessment Coordinator at St. Cloud State (Keith)
Coordinator, Campus Mediation Program ( Inkster, 2002-present)

Service to St. Cloud State University : Committees and Organizations
In addition to rotating committee work within the English Department, and maintaining maximum representation and participation in Faculty Senate (4 faculty representatives), English faculty have offered the following service:

  • General Education Committee (chair 2002)
    Strategic Planning Task Force on Vision and Mission
    Strategic Planning Committee (multiple members)
    Academic Distinction Subcommittee of the Strategic Planning Committee; Chair, 2000/2001
    University Assessment Task Force (Assessment Steering Committee, 1987-97)
    College of Fine Arts and Humanities Curriculum Committee (1999-2002)
    University Graduate Committee, 1997-2001; chair 1999-2001
    University Curriculum Committee, 1999-2001
    MnSCU Graduate Council, 1999-2001
    University-wide Graduate Council, elected 2002
    Enrollment Management Committee.
    Admission and Retention (campus-wide)
    Teacher Development Advisory Committee (campus-wide)
    Faculty Association Executive Committee (multiple members)
    Honors Advisory Committee
    African Studies Committee
    Cultural Diversity Committee
    Committee on Diversity Education
    American Indian Advisory Council
    WISER initiative, SCSU (diversity, ethics, and workplace, faculty trainer 2000-present)
    Special Academic Committee, American Indian Studies Minor development
    St. Cloud Area American Indian Center, board member
    Core Assessment Director for Core One, General Education
    Minority Studies Advisory Committee
    Faculty-administration ad hoc committee on review and redesign of Article 22 and 25
    (evaluation, promotion, tenure) processes (2from English out of 4 persons)
    Professional Improvement Committee (Chair, 1996-2001)
    IRB - campus wide review board for Human Subjects research
    Faculty Association ad hoc committee on non-renewed faculty (2001)
    DGS Advisory Board (multiple members)
    DGS Advisory Committee; Chair, Fall 1999-present
    Mediation Coordination Committee, Summer 2002-present
    Faculty Representative to Teaching, Learning, and Technology Roundtable (2 members)
    Subcommittee co-authoring Technology Master Plan, Spring 2002-present
    Grievance Officer
    SCSU/School District 742 Partnership Planning Team
    Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence Advisory Board
    Campus GLBT committee
    International Student Services Committee, St. Cloud State University (2), (1999 -present)
    East Asian Studies Committee, (1999 -present)
    Ad Hoc Committee for Online Course Offerings, (2001-present)
    Faculty Association Intl Studies Committee (2000-present)
    Assessment Committee ( College of Education )
    College of FAH Assessment Committee
    Informal consultant for Campus-wide search committees
    Liaison to Teacher Development
    University Interim Academic Organizer for Chicano/ a Programs 1997/98
    Long Range Planning Committee for the College of Education

English faculty made additional contributions to activities and programming at SCSU, giving more than 7 workshops or talks on, for example, multicultural classrooms, at the Center for Teaching Excellence, the College of Business, and other venues; one served five years as editor of the Center journal, Excellence in Teaching (1995-2001).

English faculty have presented readings of their creative work in a Faculty Showcase held twice in the Atwood Little Theater, and have also contributed to academic life by bringing speakers to campus (see B.A.:Creative Writing Program report).

English courses are used for other programs at SCSU, e.g. Women and Literature in Women's Studies, African Literature for the African Studies program, in addition to heavy reliance by SCSU on the Department's advanced writing courses.

Faculty serve on numerous university-wide search committees as well as those within the department.

3 faculty have served in the British Studies Teaching Abroad Program - Alnwick Castle

English faculty have participated substantially in distance-learning initiatives that reach out to needs for higher education regionally. Graduate courses, including in ESL, have been offered over ITV; English has offered ITV general education through Continuing Studies at least annually, particularly ENGL 184 Introduction to Literature.

Regional:

  • IFO State Board
    IFO College of FAH Representative
    IFO- MnSCU Graduate Education Task Force ( MnSCU -wide)
    IFO Academic Affairs (2002-04)
    MnSCU ESL Assessment Committee, 1998 B
    MnSCU MSU-Akita Visit Team, November 1999
    External Reviewer, TESL Program, University of Wisconsin, River Falls , 1999
    External reviewer, English Department, South Dakota State University

Additional regional consulting: South Dakota State University; Central Michigan University; Tenure and promotion review, Bowling Green State University, 1999; Ridgewater College-Willmar, Annual Native American Conference and Gathering; Math Association of America Assessment project funded by National Science Foundation:Workshops at Sioux City Iowa, April, 2002 and Richmond, VA, May, 2002.

Community:
Invited columnist, St. Cloud Times (2 faculty)

At least two faculty have assisted with grant-writing projects in the community.

Association Memberships
NCTE, MCTE, TESOL, LSA, AAAL, ADS, CCC, RSA, AAHE, MLA, MMLA, ASECS, Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing; Association for Computers and Writing; the Loft; AWP; National Society for Experiential Education, Minnesota Association for Experiential Learning, National Association of Native American Scholars, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development; Minnesota Indian Education Association, American Anthropological Association, Council on Anthropology and Education, MinneTESOL, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Language, Comparative and International Education Society, and others

Positions held by current faculty :

  • Editorial Board: Dionysos: The Literature and Addiction Triquarterly (1988-2001)
    Chair, Midwest Writing Centers Association
    Board Member, International Writing Centers Association
    Associate Editor, Issues in Integrative Studies, 2001-Present
    Peer-Reviewed journal published by Association for Integrative Studies, a national academic organization
    Co-editor, Minnesota/Wisconsin TESOL Journal, 1997, 1998, 1999
    Board Member, Association for Integrative Studies. 1995-99, 2001-present
    Co-chair, Minnesota Council of Teachers of English, English Education Committee - 1998-2001
    Council of Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (1997-98; 2000-present)
    Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (2000-present)
    Midwest Writing Centers Association (1990-94; 2000-present)

Journal submissions reviewing:

Journal of Pragmatics, 2000-01; Southwest Journal of Linguistics, 1999-2000; Pragmatics, 1997-98; ORTESOL Journal (2001); Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture (1999); Writing Center Journal (2002); two review for Choice, including Review Books and Internet Resources

Textbook reviewing, including for Longman, Mayfield, St. Martin 's, Addison-Wesley-Longman's, others

Conference presentation refereeing:

  • Referee, TESOL 2000, In-progress Proposals, 2000, 2001 .
    Member-at-Large, InterCultural Interest Section, TESOL, 2000-- CCCC (1999, 2000)
    National Reading Conference (2000)
  • Conference of the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (2002)

Additional service chairing panel sessions

Professional Communication Work:

  • The Missing Word creative writing newsletter, Editor and Writer 1994-1999.
  • Getaways (national publication).
  • IP Newsletter-editor and writer of fall/winter, 2001 issue of intellectual property newsletter distributed to faculty and TAs in Iowa State University's English dept.
  • Editorial assistance to Michael Graves on Teaching Reading in the 21st Century (1999)
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