Two girls sitting in a plastic tub

 

Communicable Disease Reporting

The Lindgren Child Care Center provides information to families verbally and in writing about any unusual level or type of communicable disease to which their child was exposed, signs and symptoms of the disease, mode of transmission, period of communicability, and control measures that are being implemented at the program and that families should implement at home. Good communication among healthcare providers, childcare providers, school health staff, parents/guardians, and the health department can play a major role in preventing the spread of communicable diseases. It is important that parents/guardians let childcare providers and/or school health staff know whenever their children are diagnosed with a communicable disease.  The childcare center will, as required by law, notify regulatory agencies as needed of communicable diseases.

Minnesota reporting rule

Many diseases must be reported to the health department. According to Minnesota rule (MCAR 4605.7040 to 4605.7900), 77 specific diseases are reportable. Disease fact sheets included in Section 6 indicate which diseases are reportable, and reportable diseases are marked with an asterisk (*) in the table of contents. Childcare providers and school health staff are required by the rule to report diseases to the health department. Some communicable diseases can be very serious, so it is important for parents to notify the classroom teachers immediately with diagnosis information. The Lindgren Child Care Center annually checks with the MDH website for any changes in the disease reporting rule: www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/reportable/rule/index.html

The following diseases are reportable in Minnesota:

Amebiasis (Entamoeba histolytica)
Anaplasmosis
Anthrax
Arboviral disease
Babesiosis
Blastomycosis
Botulism
Brucellosis
Campylobacteriosis
Cat scratch disease
Chancroid
Chlamydia trachomatis
Cholera
Coccidioidomycosis
Cryptosporidiosis
Cyclosporiasis
Dengue virus infection
Diphtheria
Diphyllobothrium latum
Ehrlichiosis
Encephalitis
Enterobacter sakazakii
Enteric E. coli infection
Giardiasis
Gonorrhea
Haemophilus influenzae disease (all invasive
disease)
Hantavirus infection
Hemolytic uremic syndrome
Hepatitis (all viral types)
Histoplasmosis
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
infection, including Acquired
Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
Influenza (unusual case incidence, critical
illness, or laboratory confirmed cases)
Kawasaki disease
Kingella spp.
Legionellosis
Leprosy
Leptospirosis
Listeriosis
Lyme disease
Malaria
Measles
Meningitis (caused by viral agents)
Meningococcal disease (Neisseria
meningitidis)
Mumps
Neonatal Sepsis
Orthopox virus
Pertussis
Plague
Poliomyelitis
Psittacosis
Q fever
Rabies
Retrovirus infections (other than HIV)
Reye syndrome
Rheumatic fever
Rocky Mountain spotted fever
Rubella and congenital rubella syndrome

 

Return to Manual

Untitled Document