Anthropology Student Learning Outcomes

1. A broad knowledge of the discipline of anthropology and its four fields

2a. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including genetic variability, heredity, and natural selection in the microevolution of populations.

2b. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including evolutionary processes leading to macroevolutionary change (speciation).

2c. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including major patterns of variation and adaptation in modern human populations.

2d. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including the place of the human species within a broader context of primate biology and evolution, and an appreciation of how studies of our closest relatives shed light of human behavior and adaptation.

2e. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including the evolutionary history of our subfamily Homininae, involving both knowledge of the fossil evidence for human evolution and the influence of cultural innovation on human evolutionary patterns.

2f. An understanding of contemporary evolutionary theory, including what it means to say that human beings are biocultural organisms.

3a. An understanding of the anthropological concept of culture, including how knowledge of human cultural learning demonstrates the lack of evidence for the existence of biological “races.”

3b. An understanding of the anthropological concept of culture, including how anthropological views of culture have changed over time.

3c. An understanding of the anthropological concept of culture, including how cultural anthropologists use participant-observation to learn about the ways of life of living peoples.

3d. the importance of symbolic activity in human activities such as language, the arts, and other creative human activities.

3e. An understanding of the anthropological concept of culture, including how cultural patterns vary over time and across the world

3f. An understanding of the anthropological concept of culture, including how cultural anthropologists study contemporary changes in the ways human beings live.

4a. An understanding of anthropological approaches to the human past, including theory in archaeology.

4b. An understanding of anthropological approaches to the human past, including archaeological field methods.

4c. An understanding of anthropological approaches to the human past, including analysis and interpretation of archaeological data.

4d. An understanding of anthropological approaches to the human past, including cultural patterns and cultural change in the human past.

5. Knowledge of major research methods used in anthropology, with firsthand research experience in at least one major formal method.

6. The ability to read, think and evaluate information critically.

7a. The ability to analyze qualitative data.

7b. The ability to analyze quantitative data.

8a. Writing skills: the ability to communicate ideas clearly.

8b. Writing skills: the ability to synthesize information.

8c. Writing skills: The ability to analyze and apply anthropological concepts.

9. Knowledge of, and respect for, human cultural diversity worldwide and through time..

10. Understanding and application of anthropological theory and method to a variety of settings.

 

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